• Arm Deceleration Training for the Baseball Pitcher
    This article offers information on arm deceleration training techniques to lessen the force that a pitcher’s arm must overcome during the pitching motion. Two factors are discussed that are important in the strength training of a pitcher: 1) the speed of the arm prior to deceleration; and 2) how a muscle or muscle group works to achieve arm deceleration. This article also includes alternative arm deceleration exercises for immediate use in programs.
  • comment 
    Tell us what you think of this article in the new
    "comments" section below.
     
  • NSCA ClassicsArm Deceleration Training for the Baseball Pitcher

     
    Summary

    This article offers information on arm deceleration training techniques to lessen the force that the baseball pitcher’s arm must overcome during the pitching motion. There are three phases to pitching: the cocking phase, the acceleration phase, and the follow-through phase. The follow-through phase is where the musculature surrounding the shoulder and elbow must decelerate the arm’s motion. Two factors are discussed that are important in the strength training of a pitcher: 1) the speed of the arm prior to deceleration and 2) how a muscle or muscle group works to achieve arm deceleration.

    Traditionally, the rotator cuff and deltoid musculature are trained slowly in eccentric contractions. However, it has been shown that using higher-speed eccentric contractions when training the strength of these muscle groups leads to more transferability from training to the field.


    Recommended Reading
    This article is recommended for reading because it provides you with information on how to properly train the shoulder to prepare pitchers for the baseball season, to decrease the likelihood of injury, and increase on-field performance. Alternative arm deceleration exercises are also provided for immediate use in programs.

    National Strength and Conditioning Journal
    Arm Deceleration Training for the Baseball Pitcher by Robert Panariello
    Volume 14, Issue 6, p. 19-25, 1992

    Read the Article (PDF) 
  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
  • Add Comment

    Text Only 2000 character limit

    0 Comments

    Page 1 of 1