• Coaches Corner with Andrea Hudy
    Andrea Hudy, MA, CSCS, RSCC*D, USAW-1, is the Assistant Athletic Director for Sport Performance at the University of Kansas (KU), where she oversees the Anderson Strength and Conditioning Complex for all KU sports. She has handled strength and conditioning for the KU men’s basketball team since her arrival in 2004. In January 2013, Hudy was named the National College Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year by the NSCA for her dedication to improving athletic performance with safe and effective science-based programs. Prior to joining KU, she served nine and a half years at the University of Connecticut, where she worked closely with the Huskies’ men’s and women’s basketball teams.
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  • CoachesCornerBannerCoaches Corner | Andrea Hudy
    Andrea Hudy, CSCS, RSCC*D

    Andrea Hudy, the Assistant Athletic Director for Sport Performance, joined the University of Kansas (KU) staff in September 2004. Hudy has handled strength and conditioning responsibilities for the KU men’s basketball team since her arrival in 2004. Hudy oversees the Anderson Strength and Conditioning Complex for all KU sports. In January 2013, Hudy was named the National College Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) for her dedication to improving athletic performance with safe and effective science-based programs. She also served nine and a half years at the University of Connecticut, where she worked closely with the Huskies’ men’s and women’s basketball teams. Hudy earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology at the University of Maryland and her Master’s of Art degree in Sport Biomechanics from the University of Connecticut. She is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist® (CSCS®) by the NSCA and a United States of America Weightlifting Level I Coach (USAW-1). Additionally, Hudy has her national massage certification. 

    Did you know? Coach Hudy was the 2012 recipient of the NSCA's College Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year Award 

    1. How long have you been working in the field of strength and conditioning?

    I have been a strength and conditioning coach at the college Division 1 level for 18 years. 

    2. What is your philosophy on training?

    My philosophy on training is a non-linear periodization method using powerlifting, weightlifting movements (or any variation thereof), and ground-based functional movements. I am dedicated to helping our student-athletes improve speed and conditioning as it relates to their sport. I am committed to creating a competitive, safe, and positive training environment in which the athletes want to improve and develop a consistent work ethic. 

    3. How has your philosophy evolved over the years?

    My philosophy has always been research driven with an emphasis on weightlifting and powerlifting movements. Because of the non-linear training method, in-season training is reactive and focuses more on adapting to their schedule after the work ethic has been developed. 

    HudyA_14. Who has influenced you the most throughout your career and why?

    Jerry Martin, Boyd Epley, and Roger Marandino have influenced me throughout my career as they changed the way I look at things in the weight room. Dr. Andrew Fry and Dr. William Kraemer have taught me how to embrace the study of exercise and apply research to my training programs. 

    5. How do you adapt your programming to fit the needs of each athlete you work with?

    By using non-linear periodization training it is easier for me to react to their schedule and practices throughout the season. Each athlete’s program is developed from a basic template and modified to meet the athlete’s specific needs and goals. 

    6. What do you think is the most overlooked concept in the field of strength and conditioning?

    In my opinion, the most overlooked concept in this field is a commitment to a year-round program for the athletes. 

    7. What resources do you use the most when it comes to getting continuing education as it pertains to the field?

    To help continue my education, I regularly attend NSCA Conferences, utilize other resources in the field, and participate in various research opportunities with Dr. Andrew Fry. I also look to hire staff members who will help increase my knowledge base. 

    8. What is your take on “specificity” of training and how (if so) do you apply it to your programming?

    The “specificity” of my athlete’s training programs comes from their core lifts (weightlifting and powerlifting movements) and the supplement exercises (specific functional movements of sport) in their program. One of the main goals of my programming is to increase each athlete’s power output. 

    9. What is your favorite tool in your tool box?

    My favorite tool is the athlete. I love to teach and motivate athletes to improve their movement efficiency and overall technique. 

    10. What are your five favorite exercises?

    My five favorite exercises are the drop squat, any weightlifting exercise, the pull-up (or any variation thereof), squat variations, and running/jumping. 

  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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