• Coaches Corner with Bo Sandoval
    Bo Sandoval, MS, CSCS, RSCC, FMS, USAW-2, is the Assistant Director of Strength and Conditioning for Olympic Sports at the University of Michigan, where he designs and implements supplemental performance programs for the men’s lacrosse and women’s basketball teams. Prior to joining the University of Michigan staff, Sandoval was the Strength and Conditioning Coordinator at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO. Sandoval also spent three seasons as the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach for Belhaven University in Jackson, MS.
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  • CoachesCornerBannerCoaches Corner | Bo Sandoval
    Bo Sandoval, MS, CSCS, RSCC, FMS, USAW-2 
    Bo Sandoval is in his fifth year at the University of Michigan. Sandoval designs and implements supplemental performance programs for the men’s lacrosse and women’s basketball teams. Prior to being named Assistant Director of Strength and Conditioning for Olympic Sports in the summer of 2012, he served as the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach for one year and an Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach for two years at the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the University of Michigan staff, Sandoval was the Strength and Conditioning Coordinator at the Olympic Training Center from 2007 – 2009 in Colorado Springs, CO. Sandoval also spent three seasons (2005 – 2007) as the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach for Belhaven University (formerly Belhaven College) in Jackson, MS. He received his Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees from the University of Southern Mississippi. Sandoval is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Coach through the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches Association (CSCCa) as well as a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist® (CSCS®) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). He is a Level 2 Senior Coach with United States of America Weightlifting (USAW) and a Registered Strength and Conditioning Coach (RSCC) by the NSCA. Sandoval is certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation/automated external defibrillator (CPR/AED) through the American Red Cross and received his Functional Movement Systems (FMS) certification in 2013.
     
    1. How long have you been working in the field of strength and conditioning?
    I started my first internship in the field of strength and conditioning in the fall of 2000.

    2. What is your philosophy (training style/methods) regarding training?
    I strive to provide competitive athletes the means by which they may train sensibly and systematically over designated periods of time in a safe, controlled, and professional environment. I also strive to utilize industry standards and scientifically supported methodologies while reinforcing the cultural competitive nature of the sport and team specified by the head sport coach.

    3. How has this philosophy evolved over the years?
    Over the years, I have learned how to take effective training methods and properly apply them to address the specific needs of an individual or team. An exercise is an exercise, but how you employ that exercise controls the adaptation/outcome.

    4. Who has influenced you the most throughout your career and why?
    I have been influenced by so many that it is tough to isolate a sole source. My education has come from many great strength coaches and sport coaches. However, my coaching style and mission have been influenced the most by a strength coach by the name of Charlie Dudley. Charlie is now the Head Strength Coach at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Charlie really taught me two virtues as a coach which I live by today. First is to encourage and second is to problem solve. If you are not doing these two things on a daily basis, then you are not coaching. Utilizing these two virtues Coach Dudley taught me, helps me to respect and appreciate the dedication that each of my athletes have to their respective craft, and also that it is a privilege that I get to help them on their competitive journey. To this day, I get the message across to my student-athletes that I am grateful to get to work with them and that I will do whatever it takes to help them reach their competitive goals.

    5. How do you adapt your programming to fit the needs of each athlete you work with?
    First, a general overview of team goals and expectations should be specified by the head coach. From these goals and expectations, an overall blanket plan is drawn up for the team to reach said goals and expectations. Considering individual characteristics such as training age, skill set, determination, injuries, position, and evaluation/screening, the blanket plan is appropriately altered to meet the needs of each individual athlete. It is time consuming and complicated but 100% necessary to raise the performance level of the overall team.

    6. What do you think is the most overlooked concept in the field of strength and conditioning?
    Appropriate training volume and intensity manipulation in order to ensure recovery and plan peak performances.

    7. What resources do you use the most when it comes to getting continuing education as it pertains to the field?
    I try to get a peek at every new piece of literature that comes out pertaining to the field. When it comes to researching specific topics, I usually refer to the Strength and Conditioning Journal (SCJ) and Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research (JSCR) applications on my iPad.

    8. What is your take on “specificity” of training and how (if so) do you apply it to your programming?
    Specificity to me refers to specific physical needs to enhance ones performance as well as exploiting certain physical characteristics strategically at specific time frames throughout the training calendar.

    9. What is your favorite tool in your tool box?
    The “weightlifting” movements. For those of you out there who are not familiar with the only barbell sport in the Olympics, it is called “weight lifting” not “Olympic lifting.” I am referring to the snatch and clean and jerk and all of their derivatives (e.g., cleans, snatches, jerks, and pulls) in as many different appropriate varieties as my athletes can stand.

    10. What are your 5 favorite exercises?
    1 – The real full range of motion barbell back squat
    2 – Snatch and its derivatives
    3 – Romanian deadlift
    4 – Jerks of all varieties
    5 – Uneven barbell side bends (for the sake of throwing a torso movement in there)


    11. What advice do you have for a young coach hoping to “follow in your footsteps?”
    Stay focused on the learning process. It is so easy to get wrapped up in your job and to forget to stay current and well versed on material related to the field. Always be willing to learn. As one of my former mentors told me, “if someone ever tells you they know it all, run the other way.” 
  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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