• Comparing Speed, Agility and Jumping Capabilities
    Inconsistent results have been reported when comparing the interrelationships of jumping, sprinting, and change-of-direction speed performances. Coaches and strength and conditioning professionals should use separate tests for jumping, sprinting and quick change-of-direction motor abilities. From the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.
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  • Speed Agility Jumping

    Read the full-length article in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

    Inconsistent results have been reported when comparing the interrelationships of jumping, sprinting, and change-of-direction speed performances. Such discrepancies may be attributed to the age, gender, and skill level of participants, or to the actual tests being compared and sample sizes used.

    A recent study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research hypothesized that there would be relatively small shared variance between jumping, sprinting, and change-of-direction speed performances indicating that these tasks require independent muscle power qualities of each other.

    Low to moderate shared variance (6–23%) was reported between the various jumping, sprinting, and change-of-direction tasks. This supports the hypothesis that there is little overlap in the muscle power qualities required for the performance of each task. Therefore, when assessing such qualities in players, coaches and strength and conditioning professionals should use separate tests for each of these qualities to ensure accurate player profiles are developed.

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  • Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

    About the Author:

    NSCA Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

    The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research is the NSCA's scientific journal. This monthly publication prints original research information important to strength and conditioning practitioners. Many educational institutions, researchers, and professionals retain this journal as a valuable reference.

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  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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