• Enhancing Motivation in High School Programs
    As a strength and conditioning coach you must have the knowledge and skills to design programs for your athletes. However, the best combination of exercises, sets, and reps will not make up for a lack of skill in athlete motivation. The tips given in this article will help take your skills in motivating your athletes to the next level. Making athletes aware of WHAT they want and how the program will help them achieve their goals will improve the athletes’ “buy-in.”
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  • NSCA ClassicsEnhancing Motivation in High School Programs

    Why You Should Read This Article     

    As a strength and conditioning coach you must have the knowledge and skills to design programs for your athletes. However, the best combination of exercises, sets, and reps will not make up for a lack of skill in athlete motivation.

    The tips given in this article will help take your skills in motivating your athletes to the next level. Making athletes aware of WHAT they want and how the program will help them achieve their goals will improve the athletes’ “buy-in.”

    Having that “buy-in” is important because it will improve their overall attitude towards the training sessions, add to their motivation, and improve your individual athletes and teams.

    Along with that, you have to be accountable for all of the athlete’s actions as well. High school athletes are still children and they admire figures of authority. If a coach has a positive lifestyle, it sets a good example for their athletes to follow.

    NSCA Strength and Conditioning Journal. 29(6): 21-22, December 2007
    Enhancing Motivation in High School Programs
    Ian Jeffreys 
     

    Read the Article (PDF) 

  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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