• The Need for Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists in Special Forces Groups
    When working with a specific population, or starting to work with a specific population, it is important to do an in-depth analysis. This article is recommended because it provides specific data on the types of common injuries found within a Special Forces group, and their relation to individuals’ participation within an exercise program.
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  • NSCA ClassicsThe Need for Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists in Special Forces Groups

    Why You Should Read This Article 

    When working with a specific population, or starting to work with a specific population, it is important to do an in-depth analysis. This includes, but is not limited to, looking at common injuries that could potentially be mitigated through a research-based exercise program. Within a particular Special Forces population, a trend of musculoskeletal injuries was found with a significant number of those injuries resulting from exercise. This suggests an opportunity where a certified strength and conditioning specialist or a tactical strength and conditioning facilitator could be very valuable in decreasing those injuries.

    Recommended Reading: This article is recommended because it provides specific data on the types of common injuries found within a Special Forces group, and their relation to individuals’ participation within an exercise program. This material can help market a TSAC-Facilitator’s value when selling their skills and expertise to a potential employer.

    TSAC Report
    The Need for Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists in Special Forces Groups by Mark D. Stephenson
    Issue 8, 2009
     

    Read the Article (PDF) 

  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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