• Training for High-Performance Collegiate Hockey
    Ice hockey is a very physically-demanding sport, requiring a unique combination of power, strength, and endurance. This article demonstrates one way of programming for these unique athletes throughout their season.
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  • NSCA ClassicsTraining for High-Performance Collegiate Ice Hockey

    Why You Should Read This Article 

    Ice hockey is a very physically-demanding sport, requiring a unique combination of power, strength, and endurance. This article demonstrates one way of programming for these unique athletes throughout their season. It also gives a good perspective on how this program is set up, according to specific physical adaptations.

    This program goes from April to early November, including a brief introduction cycle, followed by a hypertrophy cycle. This leads to two consecutive strength cycles, followed by a power/endurance cycle and then an endurance/power cycle. The final cycle is a competition cycle that acts as more of a linear (Western) periodization model, moving straight through the physical qualities of performance. To generate force, muscle is needed, which is the reason for the hypertrophy cycle. 
     
    Once the muscle is developed, the fibers must be strengthened, hence the strength cycles. And, finally, once maximum force generation is increased, that force must be produced quickly and for extended periods of time. This is where the power/endurance and endurance/power cycles become important. This article explains how Coach Hedrick has done a great job demonstrating this in his program.

    This article is recommended for reading because it provides tips on how to program for collegiate hockey players in an easy-to-read manner. Establishing training guidelines for specific sports and positions is not always easy. The article explains training variables and exercises specific to in-season ice hockey and also provides useful tables containing information on how to utilize each training cycle.

    NSCA Strength and Conditioning Journal
    Volume 24, Number 2, p. 42-52, 2002
    Training for High-Performance Collegiate Ice Hockey
     

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  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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