• NSCA Webinars
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    Building Your Business: Selling is Not Selling Out
    Being a good personal trainer does not ensure that you will have clients. You need to be able to sell the benefits and achievable results of using your services in order to build your business. Selling, for many, may bring to mind car salesmen, infomercials, and telemarketers. This can create a mindset for trainers that selling makes them somehow less honest or acting in their own self interest when trying to get someone to purchase a program. In fact, we all sell every day and enjoy it. When we recommend where to eat, which movie to watch, what book to read, we are selling. Learn how to make the act of selling personal training programs a natural, positive experience for you and your potential client. Build your business by helping others, and help them by getting them to commit to your program.
    Five Movements and the Order of Learning
    Strength training can be very complicated, but it should not be complicated at all. Basically, there are five human movements (push, pull, hinge, squat, and carries) and a sixth movement of “everything else,” but mostly groundwork. There are two overlooked areas of most people’s training philosophy: regressions and program measurement. Using some very simple tools, it is easy to see whether or not the program is working. If your program improves on simple tests, the program is working.
    Training Differences Between Men and Women
    A men's program to gain muscle may not be well suited for a woman, much like a woman's program may address key aspects which is not of most interest for men. Does it stop there, or are there other differences to consider between the genders? This webinar will look at the anatomical, endocrinological and programming differences between men and women, and show easy to implement practical guidelines and suggestions to get the best out of your male and female clients.
    Using Athlete Fitness Testing Data to Create Prescriptions for Soccer
    Coaches commonly make fitness testing part of their training programs. There are many tests that can be used to assess the current status of the participant in specific fitness categories. Typically, results are compared to past scores, athletes of similar levels, or to norms that have been found in the scientific literature. A more direct use of these data, however, is to use subject-specific results to inform subject-specific training programs. During this webinar, practical examples will be provided in which subject-specific exercise prescriptions are used to train elite youth soccer players within a periodized model.