• Anaerobic Conditioning: Training the Three Energy Systems
    This article offers information on the three bioenergetic systems - the ATP-PC system, the glycolytic system, and the oxidative system - and how to train them appropriately for performance. With this knowledge, the reader will be able to prepare an athlete with the conditioning foundation needed to succeed in their sport.
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  • NSCA ClassicsAnaerobic Conditioning: Training the Three Energy Systems
     
    Summary
    This article offers information on the three bioenergetic systems and how to train them appropriately for performance. The adenosine triphosphate Creatine-phosphate (ATP-PC) system provides energy at a rapid rate for activities lasting 15 seconds or less. The glycolytic, or lactic acid system, provides energy for those activities lasting 15 seconds to 2 minutes. Lastly, the oxidative system provides energy for those activities lasting longer than 2 minutes. Using this basic information can allow the coach to program effective conditioning programs for their athlete. Every athlete should have some conditioning within each system; it just depends on the requirements of their sport on how much of each type will be utilized (i.e., how focused will the program be on the ATP-CP, glycolytic, or oxidative systems?).

    Recommended Reading
    This article is recommended for reading because it provides the reader with the basic knowledge needed on the energy systems to design a proper conditioning program for their athletes. With this knowledge, the reader will be able to prepare an athlete with the conditioning foundation needed to succeed in their sport.

    National Strength and Conditioning Journal
    Anaerobic Conditioning: Training the Three Energy Systems, by Kris Berg, PhD
    February-March, p. 48-50, 1982

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  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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      This article was published in 1983. Maybe it would be more beneficial to look into a newer updated article to explain the energy systems. Good article overall but a more recent publication would be appreciated.

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