• Client Motivation Series
    So much emphasis in the fitness industry is centered on program design and the latest and greatest training tools/techniques. As personal trainers, we often forget that the best plans go to waste if our clients do not “buy-in” to what they are doing. In this two-part article, Michael Ranieri discusses goal setting and motivation related to client retention.
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  • NSCA ClassicsClient Motivation Series

    Why You Should Read This Article          

    So much emphasis in the fitness industry is centered on program design and the latest and greatest training tools/techniques. As personal trainers, we often forget that the best plans go to waste if our clients don’t “buy-in” to what they’re doing.

    In this 2-part article, Michael Ranieri discusses goal setting and motivation related to client retention. The first article provides an excellent resource that can be used to determine self-motivation. 


    This Self-motivation Assessment Scale identifies a clients level of motivation and their likelihood of exercise compliance. The information provided from your client can be used when you are designing a given clients program. Why is this important?

    As personal trainers we all know that clients are motivated to various degrees and value exercise differently. Consider two clients; one who enjoys strenuous workouts and finds soreness as a sense of accomplishment. The other client doesn’t enjoying sweating and soreness. 


    Will you program and treat them the same? By identifying their level of motivation you can adapt their training program to better meet their expectations.

    Client Motivation: Part 1.   
    Ranieri, Michael J.
    August 1995 - Volume 23 - Issue 5 - pg 53-54 
     
     
     
  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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