• From the Field with Paul Goldberg
    Paul Goldberg, CSCS, RD, is currently the Human Performance Program Coordinator at 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Tactical Human Optimization Rapid Rehabilitation and Reconditioning (THOR3) at Fort Carson in Colorado Springs, CO. Now in his 20th year as a strength coach and Registered Dietitian (RD), Paul comes from a tactical training and professional sports background.
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  • From the Field BannerFrom the Field | Paul GoldbergPaul Goldberg, CSCS, RD, USAWEntering his 20th year as a strength coach and Registered Dietitian (RD), Paul Goldberg is currently the Human Performance Program Coordinator at 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Tactical Human Optimization Rapid Rehabilitation and Reconditioning (THOR3) at Fort Carson in Colorado Springs, CO. He has also worked for Naval Special Warfare, the Colorado Avalanche National Hockey League (NHL) team, and Division I athletic programs. Goldberg is certified by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), United States of America Weightlifting (USAW), and United States of America Triathlon (USAT).
     
    1. What Tactical population do you currently work with?
    10th Special Forces Group (Airborne)

    2. How did you get started in the TSAC (Tactical Strength and Conditioning) field?
    I was asked to do a couple strength and conditioning and nutrition presentations for some Special Operations Forces (SOF) groups. I really enjoyed working with them. When an opportunity became available to work within the SOF community I jumped all over it.

    3. What resources do you utilize for continuing education? And are there any sources you recommend staying away from?
    National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), United States of America Weightlifting (USAW), Perform Better, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND), and Sports, Cardiovascular, and Wellness Nutrition (SCAN). I recommend staying away from Internet gurus.

    4. If you where hiring someone in your field, what would you look for?
    For me, the interview process starts as soon as I meet them or I get a resume. The resume can reflect education and some of their experiences, but I want to know about their character and if they are a good fit for my population and staff as well. How do they carry themselves? Are they organized? Can they communicate well? A candidate may look great on paper and be a great strength coach, but they will not last long if they are not a good fit for this community.

    5. Please describe the regular duties included in your position?
    I am currently the Human Performance Program Coordinator 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne) Tactical Human Optimization Rapid Rehabilitation and Reconditioning (THOR3). I oversee the daily operations of seven strength and conditioning coaches, four physical therapist, one sports registered dietitian, one sports psychologist, and one data analysis. I have the finest human performance staff in the country, period. I have the pleasure of watching and learning from them as they work with our soldiers. Very similar to a Division I athletic department—we write programs, train teams, test and evaluate, council, and do whatever is needed to help our soldiers accomplish their mission and return home safely.

    6. What are the three most important things you have learned; that you wish you knew when you were starting your career?
    1) The mental component of the human performance puzzle is much larger than we know or understand.
    2) This profession is based on relationships. If you do not create or foster them you will not be successful.
    3) The more I learn, the more I realize I do not know anything

    7. What recommendations would you give someone who is looking to start a career in TSAC?
    1) Get as many different experiences as you can.
    2) Keep an open mind and learn from everyone you meet.
    3) Nothing works if you do not.

    8. What do you believe are the top three physical requirements for this population that must be addressed in a proper TSAC program?
    1) Overall strength
    2) Overall conditioning
    3) Mobility, flexibility, and agility

    9. What steps do you go through when writing a program for the population you work with?
    1) Mission goals
    2) Team Goals
    3) Individual goals/needs as they relate to the mission and team goals

    10. What are some critical factors in getting tactical athletes to buy into a strength and conditioning program?
    Exposure to the program; typically, most soldiers have not been exposed to an athletic-based, periodized, goal-oriented training program. Do not get me wrong, these guys workout extremely hard. But once you expose them to what a training program should look like, the difference between working out versus training, and how the “how” and “why” of the program fit in ... then they will buy in.
     
  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
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