Article List
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    The Perception and Progression of the Female Athlete
    Female athletes in the United States have made great progress in sports since Title IX was enacted in 1972. Despite the progress they have made, female athletes have yet to gain full recognition for their athleticism and their achievements. The purpose of this article is to break down the stigma female athletes have received over the years and shine light on the differences that make female athletes a reward to train.
    Anatomical Core – Neural Integration
    Isolated muscle training methods do not necessarily transfer to better sports performance, because technique as well as strength contributes to successful performance. Resistance training for dynamic sports must involve ground-based movements that incorporate the coordinated stabilizing and dynamic functions of multiple muscles.
    Understanding and Managing Stress in Collegiate Athletics
    It is important for strength and conditioning coaches, sport coaches, athletic trainers, and administrators to recognize and address the evidence of stress within student-athletes in order to avoid chronic stress-related anxiety and injury.
    Stability and the Squat: Front-Loaded versus Back-Loaded Squatting—Part 4
    Squatting may be commonplace in the weight room, but proper execution of this great exercise is difficult. Strength and conditioning coaches will need to properly select exercises and cue their athletes in a way that not only allows for a proper stabilizing strategy to occur, but promotes it.
    Hamstring Electromyography during Kettlebell Swings
    According to a recent study, the hip hinge kettlebell swing produced the greatest amount of hamstring surface electromyography of the three styles of kettlebell swings that were assessed. These findings have implications for the application of kettlebell swing exercises in strength and conditioning, injury prevention, and rehabilitation programs.
    Practical Methods for the Strength and Conditioning Coach to Develop Student-Athlete Leadership—Part I
    In the intercollegiate athletic setting, the strength and conditioning coach can play a role in the development of student-athlete leadership. For the strength and conditioning coach to be a positive contributor to this effort, he or she must have a clear understanding of their role, the role of the sport coach, and the interaction and relationship between the two.
    Introduction to Sport Psychology
    Similarities and overlaps exist between the realm of sport psychology and the profession of strength and conditioning coaching. This article provides a basic introduction to sport psychology and provides some guidance for preliminary directions; ideally, it will help strength and conditioning coaches find effective people and resources to help them in their coaching pursuits.
    Long-Term Athletic Development (LTAD) as a Cradle-to-Grave Model
    LTAD has evolved and increased in popularity to address motor skill competence, muscle strength attainment, proper amounts of sports participation based on chronological age, and reduced risk of sports injuries. To fully embrace LTAD, coaches of all levels and athletes of all ages need to work together to fully integrate the acquisition and refinement of play, fitness, and sports participation across the lifespan.
    German Volume Training
    A study that investigated the effect of modified German volume training on muscular hypertrophy and strength concluded that the modified German volume training program is no more effective than performing five sets per exercise for increasing muscle hypertrophy and strength. To maximize hypertrophic training effects, it is recommended that 4 – 6 sets per exercise be performed.
    Stability and Weightlifting: Training Stability—Part 3
    This article is the third installment of a four-part series on stabilization in weight training. It covers how to train trunk stability and how to decrease the dominance of the extension/compression stabilizing strategy (ECSS) that is often perpetuated during training.