• A Theoretical Model of Strength Training
    This article is recommended for reading because it provides you with tips on how to program in a long-term plan for your athletes as it relates to what physical capacities are to be improved. Planning the training of your athletes ahead of time will allow the proper adaptations to take place and prepare them for the succeeding phase of training.
  • comment 
    Tell us what you think of this article in the new
    "comments" section below.
     
  • NSCA ClassicsA Theoretical Model of Strength Training

    Why You Should Read This Article       

    Program design is crucial to the success of a sports team or an individual athlete. Without a planned training program, athletes are more susceptible to overtraining. This is especially true if certain phases or types of training are performed when athletes are not physically prepared for these conditions. 

    This article explains the proper way to prepare athletes for certain work capacities, taking you through the traditional phases of program design: hypertrophy, basic strength, strength-power, and peaking maintenance. 

    This article also explains how each phase prepares the body for the subsequent phase and what adaptations should be expected. For example, a positive change in body composition and short-term endurance can be expected from the hypertrophy phase. This knowledge can help you in programming the next phases for your athletes in preparing them for their next competition or peaking stage.

    This article is recommended for reading because it provides you with tips on how to program in a long-term plan for your athletes as it relates to what physical capacities are to be improved. Planning the training of your athletes ahead of time will allow the proper adaptations to take place and prepare them for the succeeding phase of training. 

    NSCA Strength and Conditioning Journal. August-September 1982
    A Theoretical Model of Strength Training
    Stone, MH, et al.  
     

    Read the Article (PDF) 

  • Disclaimer: The National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) encourages the exchange of diverse opinions. The ideas, comments, and materials presented herein do not necessarily reflect the NSCA’s official position on an issue. The NSCA assumes no responsibility for any statements made by authors, whether as fact, opinion, or otherwise. 
  • Add Comment

    Text Only 2000 character limit

    0 Comments

    Page 1 of 1