Incorporate Dynamic and Static Core Exercises

by Developing the Core
Kinetic Select May 2017

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Static and dynamic conditioning of the core musculature is important in activities of daily living and in sport. This book excerpt includes sample static exercises to strengthen the core muscles responsible for stabilization against, or movement through, the four basic movement patterns.

The following is an exclusive excerpt from the book Developing the Corepart of the NSCA’s Science of Strength and Conditioning Series with Human Kinetics. All text and images provided by Human Kinetics.

Static and dynamic conditioning of the core musculature is important in activities of daily living (ADLs) and in sport. Static strength of the core musculature is necessary to stabilize and hold a particular body position for the purpose of pushing or pulling with the upper extremities. For example, keeping the torso taut is necessary to safely and efficiently place a heavy box on an overhead shelf or defend a position when playing basketball.

Examples of activities requiring dynamic conditioning of the core musculature include shoveling snow and pitching a baseball. Complete conditioning of the core musculature should include performing isometric and dynamic exercises through multiple planes. Well-conditioned core muscles increase proficiency in performing multi-joint movements such as squatting and lunging and may decrease the chance of injury.

In cases where dynamic exercises are contraindicated because of pain or injury, static core exercises may be used, provided they do not cause any pain or discomfort to the exerciser. For example, a person who experiences low back pain during a dynamic trunk lateral flexion exercise such as side bends can train the same musculature isometrically.

Performing a static exercise such as a side bridge trains the muscles involved in lateral flexion without dynamic movement and may allow the exerciser to do so without any pain.
Table 5.2 includes sample static exercises to strengthen the core muscles responsible for stabilization against, or movement through, the four basic movement patterns.

The NSCA, the world’s leading sport conditioning organization, offers its unrivaled expertise in a book perfect for any athlete seeking to strengthen the core and improve athletic performance. Featuring 11 ready-to-use sport-specific programs, Developing the Core provides more than 50 of the most effective exercises along with science-based assessments to help athletes understand their individual needs. The book is available in bookstores everywhere, as well as online at the NSCA Store.

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