Bioenergetic Demands of American Football—Considerations for Developing a Preparatory Conditioning Program

by Jace A. Derwin, CSCS, RSCC
NSCA Coach May 2019
Vol 5, Issue 4

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This article is intended to provide an understanding of the demands of football from a bioenergetic perspective and provides a framework in which strength and conditioning professionals can design conditioning plans that focus on preparing athletes for competition.

Preparation of the American football athlete requires the development of a wide array of physical qualities. Strength, muscular size, and speed all play important roles within the domain of the game. The expansion of bioenergetic efficiency within competition is equally important when it comes to the preparatory needs of the football athlete. Strength and conditioning plans devoid of specific and logical energy system development may not provide the appropriate stimulus to prepare athletes for competition. This article is intended to provide an understanding of the demands of the game from a bioenergetic perspective and provides a framework in which strength and conditioning professionals can design conditioning plans that focus on preparing athletes for competition.

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This article originally appeared in NSCA Coach, a quarterly publication for NSCA Members that provides valuable takeaways for every level of strength and conditioning coach. You can find scientifically based articles specific to a wide variety of your athletes’ needs with Nutrition, Programming, and Youth columns. Read more articles from NSCA Coach »

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References

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Jace Derwin holds a Bachelor’s degree from Seattle Pacific University in Exercise Science. He has experience in sports science and performance testing ...

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Available to:
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Audience:
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Topics:
Program design
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