Men’s Lacrosse Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention

by Jessi Glauser, MS, CSCS,*D, Justin Kilian, MEd, CSCS,*D, and Bridget Ann Frugoli Melton, EdD, CSCS,*D, TSAC-F,*D
NSCA Coach August 2021
Vol 8, Issue 2

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The purpose of this article is to present a sample injury prevention program with a specific emphasis on lower body posterior chain development throughout competitive and non-competitive college lacrosse seasons.

Introduction

Lacrosse is often referred to as the fastest game on two feet and is one of the fastest-growing sports in the United States with participation surging to 829,423 athletes across all competitive levels (23). Participation at the collegiate level across all divisions accounts for 43,228 athletes based on the most recent participation report by U.S. Lacrosse (23). Lacrosse gameplay dictates the inclusion of collision and contact engagements (5,11). However, non-contact injuries are sustained at all levels of play resulting in time loss from participation (13). Due to the nature of the high-velocity changes in direction and collision impacts commonly observed in men’s lacrosse, time-loss injuries have been attributed to player-to-player contact, equipment contact, non-contact events, and deterioration due to chronic overuse of connective and contractile tissues (11,14,22).

This article originally appeared in NSCA Coach, a quarterly publication for NSCA Members that provides valuable takeaways for every level of strength and conditioning coach. You can find scientifically based articles specific to a wide variety of your athletes’ needs with Nutrition, Programming, and Youth columns. Read more articles from NSCA Coach »

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References

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About the author

Mr Jessi Glauser, MS, CSCS,*D

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Jessi Glauser is an Assistant Professor of exercise science at Liberty University, specializing in movement analysis and strength and conditioning. ...

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Mr Justin Kilian, MEd, CSCS,*D

Educator, Liberty University

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Justin Kilian is a doctoral candidate in health and human performance, currently working through the dissertation process. He is an assistant profes ...

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Bridget Ann Frugoli Melton, EdD, CSCS,*D, TSAC-F,*D

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Bridget Melton is a Professor of Exercise Science and Coaching Education, teaching a variety of undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral level courses. ...

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