Monitoring Training Load in American Football

by Andrew Murray, CSCS
NSCA Coach February 2019
Vol 5, Issue 4

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Monitoring training load is essential for determining if athletes are adapting positively or negatively to their training program. This article goes over the various measurement metrics and includes recommendations to monitor training load for football athletes.

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References

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Andrew Murray was most recently the Director of Performance and Sport Science at the University of Oregon. Previously, he was the Senior Sports Physio ...

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