Proximal Position Dictates Hip Performance and Health

by Greg Spatz, PT, DPT, PRC, CSCS, Trevor Rappa, DPT, PT, PRC, CSCS, and Doug Kechijian, DPT, MA, PT, PRC
NSCA Coach June 2017
Vol 4, Issue 4

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This article provides strength and conditioning coaches with strategies to address hip mobility limitations that may lead to lumbar spine and femoral acetabular issues.

Performance training programs typically include methods to improve the desired physiological qualities of speed, power, strength, and energy system development (amongst others) that are most applicable to the relevant sporting actions. While implementing these methods, athletes must manage challenges, such as maintaining orthopedic health. This article will provide strength and conditioning coaches with strategies to address hip mobility limitations that may lead to lumbar spine and femoral acetabular issues. These issues might include low back pain and related injuries (e.g., spondylolisthesis, facet joint pathology, and sacroiliac joint dysfunction), and hip or knee related injuries (e.g., anterior cruciate ligament [ACL] injury, femoral acetabular impingement, and hip labrum pathology). Pain, pathology, and performance in the distal segment of a joint articulation should not be regarded as distinct from its positional relationship to the proximal segment (1,2,3,5,8).

This article originally appeared in NSCA Coach, a quarterly publication for NSCA Members that provides valuable takeaways for every level of strength and conditioning coach. You can find scientifically based articles specific to a wide variety of your athletes’ needs with Nutrition, Programming, and Youth columns. Read more articles from NSCA Coach Â»

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Gregory Spatz, CSCS

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Greg Spatz is a performance-based physical therapist and strength and conditioning coach who recognizes the continuum of rehabilitation to sports perf...

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Trevor Rappa, CSCS

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