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Resistance Exercise Preserves Physical Function of Older Adults—Implications for Strength and Conditioning Professionals

by Victor M. Tringali, CSCS,*D
NSCA Coach October 2018
Vol 5, Issue 2

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Older adults who desire to remain physically active at work, recreation, or sport can improve muscular strength, physical performance, and injury prevention if engaged in a properly designed resistance exercise program. The programming considerations presented herein may serve as a useful reference for strength and conditioning professionals working closely with active older adults.

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This article originally appeared in NSCA Coach, a quarterly publication for NSCA Members that provides valuable takeaways for every level of strength and conditioning coach. You can find scientifically based articles specific to a wide variety of your athletes’ needs with Nutrition, Programming, and Youth columns. Read more articles from NSCA Coach »

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References

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2. Gard, M, Dionigi, R, Horton, S, Baker, J, Weir, P, and Dionigi, C. The normalization of sport for older people? Annals of Leisure Research 20(3): 253-272, 2017.

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4. Law, TD, Clark, LA, and Clark, BC. Resistance exercise to prevent and manage sarcopenia and dynapenia. Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics 36(1): 205, 2016.

5. Martins, WR, Safons, MP, Bottaro, M, Blascyk, JC, Diniz, LR, Fonseca, RMC, et al. Effects of short term elastic resistance training on muscle mass and strength in untrained older adults: A randomized clinical trial. BMC Geriatrics 15: 99, 2015.

6. Ortman, JM, Velkoff, VA, and Hogan, H. An aging nation: The older population in the United States. United States Census Bureau, Economics and Statistics Administration, US Department of Commerce, 2014.

7. Pinto, RS, Correa, CS, Radaelli, R, Cadore, EL, Brown, LE, and Bottaro, M. Short-term strength training improves muscle quality and functional capacity of elderly women. Age 36(1): 365-372, 2014.

8. Santos, GM, Montrezol, FT, Pauli, LS, Sartori-Cintra, AR, Colantonio, E, and Gomes, RJ. Undulatory physical resistance training program increases maximal strength in elderly type 2 diabetics. Einstein (São Paulo) 12(4): 425-432, 2014.

9. Scanlon, TC, Fragala, MS, Stout, JR, Emerson, NS, Beyer, KS, Oliveria, LP, and Hoffman, JR. Muscle architecture and strength: Adaptations to short-term resistance training in older adults. Muscle and Nerve 49(4): 584-592, 2014.

10. Walker, S, Peltonen, H, and Häkkinen, K. Medium-intensity, high-volume “hypertrophic” resistance training did not induce improvements in rapid force production in healthy older men. Age 37(3): 41, 2015.

11. Willoughby DS. Current comments are official statements by the American College of Sports Medicine concerning topics of interest to the public at large. Indianapolis, IN: American College of Sports Medicine, 2015.

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Victor M. Tringali, CSCS,*D

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Victor Tringali is currently employed by the University of Virginia, where he is responsible for design and administration of wellness programming for ...

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