The Bilateral Deficit—Plausible Explanations and Solvents

by John M. McNamara, PhD, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D, USAW, and Max Barnhart, CSCS
NSCA Coach November 2014
Vol 3, Issue 4

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By adhering to the basic principles of training, including progressive overload, periodization, and a safe lifting environment, the bilateral deficit can be improved by the amalgamation of unilateral force production, maximal effort, and repeated effort training.

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This article originally appeared in NSCA Coach, a quarterly publication for NSCA Members that provides valuable takeaways for every level of strength and conditioning coach. You can find scientifically based articles specific to a wide variety of your athletes’ needs with Nutrition, Programming, and Youth columns. Read more articles from NSCA Coach »

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References 

1. Zatsiorsky, VM. Science and Practice of Strength Training. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 60-107, 1995. 
2. Bobbert, F, de Graaf, WW, Jonk, JN, and Casius, RL. Explanation of the bilateral deficit in human vertical squat jumping. Journal of Applied Physiology 100(2): 493-499, 2006. 
3. Baechle, TR, and Earle, RW. Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning (3rd ed.) Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 99-415, 2008. 
4. Verkhoshanksy, Y, and Siff, M. Supertraining (6th ed.) Ultimate Athlete Concepts; 1-34, 2009. 
5. Lin, J, and Chen, T. Diversity of strength training methods: A theoretical approach. Strength and Conditioning Journal 34(2): 42-49, 2012. 
6. Brown, LE. Strength Training. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 19-20, 2007.

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John M. McNamara, PhD, CSCS, NSCA-CPT

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John McNamara is a Tenured Professor at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, NY. He received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees at the University of Al ...

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Max Barnhart, CSCS

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Max Barnhart served as a strength and conditioning coach for six years at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division-I level prior t ...

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