NSCA’s Coaching Podcast, Episode 94: Andrew Stocks

by Eric McMahon, MEd, CSCS, RSCC*D and Andrew Stocks, CSCS, NSCA-CPT, RSCC
Coaching Podcast January 2021

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Andy Stocks, Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach at Augustana University and recently named NSCA Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year, talks to the NSCA Coaching and Sport Science Program Manager, Eric McMahon, about persevering as a young coach in a tough career field. Topics under discussion include how his weightlifting and powerlifting background help him program for student-athletes and what he envisions his future as a head coach might look like someday.

Find Andy on Instagram: @stocksthestrengthcoach or @augiestrength and Twitter: @augiestrength | Find Eric on Instagram: @ericmcmahoncscs or Twitter: @ericmcmahoncscs

Show Notes

“I think it's great to know all those advanced methods and advanced principles. And it's just another tool in the toolbox. And you can use that somewhere down the road, or you can use pieces of it here and there in your training a collegiate athlete. But the-- but traditional training and simple programming, it works, and it's widely used because it works.” 14:32

“Our volleyball team, in particular, is always saying, I want to see another team's weightlifting cards. I want to see their programs and see if they're stronger than us. And I'm sure there's other teams out there that are really strong. But the fact that they think they're the strongest is really cool to see.” 25:24

“…being a young coach is hard. And so being able to stick through it, and you'll eventually land something. Something's going to pop up, and keeping in touch with people is powerful in that aspect.” 33:06

Transcript

[00:00:00.00] [MUSIC PLAYING]

[00:00:00.69] Welcome to the NSCA Coaching Podcast, episode 94.

[00:00:04.99] You know, I did three internships before I found a graduate assistantship. And then after that, I didn't find a full-time job right away and had to do another internship. But I just kept at it. And I knew if I kept getting those experiences, something is going to pop up.

[00:00:21.38] This is the NSCA's Coaching Podcast where we talk to strength and conditioning coaches about what you really need to know, but probably didn't learn in school. There's strength and conditioning, and then there's everything else.

[00:00:32.22] Hey, everyone, and welcome to the NSCA Coaching Podcast. I'm Eric McMahon, your host, and I want to take a moment to thank all of our attendees and speakers from the 2021 NSCA Coaches Conference. It was an exciting event. We had over 1,200 attendees, and there were some really great presentations.

[00:00:52.56] I loved hearing from Coach Dan Dalrymple of the New Orleans Saints, on adjustments he and his staff made this season dealing with COVID-19. And there were a number of good presentations on coaching behaviors. Keynote Brett Bartholomew, as well as Adam and Mary Kate Feit really brought some great context to our process as strength and conditioning coaches.

[00:01:14.66] There were other sessions on integrating technology and monitoring in the weight room. John Wagle, Guy Hornsby, and Kelly Dormandy shared some perspective on this. Other great topics-- Matt Ibrahim on deceleration and landing skills, and Indiana's William Ali talking about power and skill-related components of the vertical jump.

[00:01:37.12] Tons of great education content. One session I really enjoyed was the Gatorade Performance Partner Panel with John Jost, Andrea Hudy, Pat Ivey, and Joe Kenn, bringing so much experience and what they had to share in the message to young coaches.

[00:01:54.43] On day one we were also able to highlight our NSCA college and professional Coach of the Year award winners. This year's winners included Paul Goodman of the NHL Chicago Blackhawks; Dr. Brian Thompson, the strength and conditioning director at Springfield College; and Andrew Stocks, this year's Assistant College Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year Award winner from Augustana University. Today we are joined by Andy on the podcast, so stay with us, and thanks for tuning in.

[00:02:26.07] Welcome to the NCAA Coaching Podcast, episode 94.

[00:02:30.07] You know, I did three internships before I found a graduate assistantship. And then after that I didn't find a full-time job right away, and had to do another internship. But I just kept at it. And I knew if I kept getting those experiences, something is going to pop up.

[00:02:46.71] This is the NSCA's Coaching Podcast, where we talk to strength and conditioning coaches about what you really need to know, but probably didn't learn in school. There's strength and conditioning, and then there's everything else.

[00:02:57.49] Welcome back to the NSCA Coaching Podcast. Today our guest is Andy Stocks, the assistant strength and conditioning coach at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Andy is the recent winner of the Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year Award from the NSCA. So first, I just want to say congratulations, man. This is a huge honor to get a national level award as a young strength coach in the field, and we are just very excited to have you on today.

[00:03:28.92] Thanks for having me, Eric. It's good to be here.

[00:03:31.64] You know, I want to start the episode just by having you tell your story. How did you get into the field of strength and conditioning? What led you down this path? And yeah, tell us your story.

[00:03:42.70] So it all really starts in high school. I played high school football. I wasn't good. And when I say I wasn't good, I mean I was last on the depth chart when I was a freshman. And so I worked my way to a starting role by the time I was a senior.

[00:03:58.81] But it was all because of the weight room. And I just played football and lifted during the off-season, and kind of realized I liked lifting just as much or more than playing football. So I reaped a lot of benefits from training in the weight room during high school.

[00:04:18.34] After high school, I found-- eventually found the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, that they had a really good exercise science and strength and conditioning program. So I was very fortunate to have that specialized program and strength and conditioning during my undergrad. We took we took classes on periodization. We took practical classes where we went in the weight room and learned how to perform lifts, learned how to coach lifts.

[00:04:46.72] So I'm really fortunate for that academic background during my undergrad. I got to be classmates with a lot of people that went on to be really successful strength coaches. And that network from UW-La Crosse is pretty strong. So maybe you've had some La Crosse grads on your podcast before.

[00:05:07.35] So from La Crosse, I went to-- I did an internship at the University of Michigan with the Olympic sports staff there. And then I went on to do an internship at the Colorado Springs Olympic Training Center. Then I did an internship at the University of Missouri, and then a graduate assistantship at South Dakota State, and I was there for two years.

[00:05:29.15] And then I went on to do another internship-- couldn't find a full-time assistant position. Did another internship at the Lake Placid Olympic Training Center. And then from there, I had a job at a private facility in Greenville, South Carolina for about eight months. And then after that, I landed at Augie. So I've been here for-- this is my sixth season, sixth year.

[00:05:53.18] That's awesome. Yeah. No, UW La Crosse is a well-known program in the field of strength and conditioning. And I've actually worked with a number of grads from that program across the years in professional baseball. And, yeah, just a great curriculum and program to develop as a strength coach coming out of the Midwest, that region of the country. If you're from that area and looking for an exercise science or strength and conditioning-focused program with a real applied element and a great coaching network, that is one of the great schools out there.

[00:06:31.01] You know, Augustana is a Division II school. And this year for our Coach of the Year awards we actually had two winners from the Division II or Division III levels. A lot of times it's Division I, Power Five conference coaches that win these awards. So I thought that was really unique that this year we had two winners from the lower divisions.

[00:06:56.57] Talk about coaching at the Division II level, and what are some of the differences you've seen from stops along the way? And what are some of the things you really like about it?

[00:07:06.57] So at Augustana, I work with softball, volleyball, soccer, swimming, and track and field, and I also assist with football and with basketball. So I have five teams of my own, and assist with at least two more. Sometimes I help here and there with other sports as well.

[00:07:27.10] So usually at Division II level you have a lot of sports. Most of my time is spent in the weight room. There'll be days where I don't even go into my office, that I'm just in the weight room all day coaching groups. So I think my time is spent where I'm best utilized, and that's in the weight room.

[00:07:50.27] Some differences maybe from higher levels, FBS Power Five schools, you might not have to do a lot of the small things like warm-ups or practice or different things like that. We don't travel with the teams really, because we have so many other responsibilities. I can't travel on Fridays because I got a whole bunch of other teams in the weight room.

[00:08:16.82] So it's been really great to work with so many different teams and be able to coach so many different athletes. I think I coach 200 to 250 athletes at our school. So it's really great to get to know that many athletes and have an impact on that many athletes.

[00:08:35.69] One of the themes that I've heard from college coaches this year is that with COVID-19 and the different restrictions we've had in the weight room, staffs haven't really grown, but we've had to manage more groups. And how was 2020 for you and your staff? How did you guys manage the more training sessions, the working with smaller groups of athletes. How was that for you?

[00:09:03.78] Right. So the main restriction we really had was we were limited to 20 athletes in the weight room at a time. So we have a 3,500 square foot weight room. We have eight racks. So sometimes we can get up to 40 kids in there. I train the whole track team at once. So we might have 40 student athletes in there at once. But that 20-person limit really had us-- we had to get creative with how we schedule.

[00:09:35.91] Some teams, that meant they were doing more than one group, which wasn't the norm the last year. So we were just coaching more groups. We're pretty lucky that we were able to start training in June. So the kids didn't have that much time off if they were around Sioux Falls. So other than that 20-person limit and other random policies and procedures, it hasn't changed that much. But that 20-person limit kind of spread us thin a little bit.

[00:10:08.64] Yeah. So I want to dive into your training philosophy and your approach with athletes. When you were at UW-La Crosse, you were on the club team for the powerlifting and Olympic lifting. How has that influenced your philosophy as a strength and conditioning coach, working with athletes, and what you do with the various sports you work with?

[00:10:31.19] Yeah. So competing in weightlifting and powerlifting has really been a cornerstone of my strength and conditioning career. It's really given me insight into the training process and tapering and peaking and competing and things like that. When I'm looking for more knowledge and improving my knowledge of exercises and programming and things like that, I want it for two reasons. I want it for my athletes, but I also want it for me for competing. So everything kind of goes both ways.

[00:11:10.40] Like, when I'm looking at a more strength and conditioning, in the strength and conditioning field, that stuff helps me with my weightlifting, powerlifting, and training. And then vice versa, where if I gain knowledge on technique and program for weightlifting and powerlifting, it also helps me train my athletes.

[00:11:29.35] And it's kind of the athletes get wind that I compete, and it really gains me a lot of respect with my athletes, that they know that I still compete, and I go out there and put it on the line. And if there's a meet in town, the kids always want to come and cheer. So that's really, really cool.

[00:11:49.51] That's awesome, man. These are sort of foundational approaches to training. When you look at powerlifting as a foundation for strength and conditioning development, for athletes, Olympic lifting, being integrated into field sport athletes programs, what are the differences in terms of how you approach training yourself versus how you approach training your athletes who are competing outside the weight room?

[00:12:26.87] Right. So I think the biggest thing is how much time you're spending lifting. If you're-- if I'm training a volleyball player, they don't need to lift five or six times a week because they need to go play volleyball and do other things, where it's OK if I want to lift five or six times a week because that's my sport.

[00:12:45.01] So as far as technique and stuff like that is concerned, I don't really like the excuse of I'm not-- we're not training weightlifters, or we're not training powerlifters. A good clean is a good clean, no matter what kind of athlete you are. So that knowledge of technique has really, really helped me in coaching my athletes and coaching my athletes to be really, really proficient at the Olympic lifts and the powerlifts as an athlete playing another sport.

[00:13:23.75] I know when we were talking, getting ready for the podcast, you were talking about at the Division II level you're not going to have all of the resources that a professional sports team would have or a Division I program in many cases would have. Speak to the value of traditional programming like powerlifting, Olympic lifting, and just sticking to the fundamentals of strength and conditioning and where that stands today with all the growth and technology in sports science and monitoring practices that are growing in the field.

[00:14:07.17] And I hear a voice of traditional training and programming, and that this still carries so much value and relevance for athletes. And I think sometimes we just go so far down the rabbit hole of advanced training techniques that we get further from sort of our foundation. What are your thoughts on that?

[00:14:32.53] Right. I think it's great to know all those advanced methods and advanced principles. And it's just another tool in the toolbox. And you can use that somewhere down the road, or you can use pieces of it here and there in your training a collegiate athlete. But the-- but traditional training and simple programming, it works, and it's widely used because it works.

[00:15:00.70] So I really believe you need to build a foundation of these simple things-- squat, hinge, press, pull, Olympic lift. Build a strong base of those things before you really progress to anything more advanced. We don't have a huge budget here, so I don't have an iPad on every rack, and I don't have VVT on every rack and things like that. And we have-- the kids get paper programs.

[00:15:30.64] And so just being able to write a simple program and make it work I think is hugely valuable in increasing athletic performance. If you can get kids really strong and really powerful, that's going to transfer. So it's great to have the knowledge of more advanced things, and it's great that the [INAUDIBLE] advancing in technology and all this stuff. But I don't think we need-- I think we can't lose sight of the fact that simple programming works.

[00:16:06.39] I get kids-- we get kids that have never lifted before coming into college. I'm not going to throw that kid on some super advanced program. I kind of use-- I sometimes use more advanced things as a sort of reward for my athletes. Like if a team works really hard, we could get into wave loading or cluster sets or chains, bands, things like that. And they get excited for those things.

[00:16:31.46] So I kind of use that as an incentive. Like, hey, you guys worked really hard. Like, you did this 5 by 5 program, and we did we did the regular stuff, and now we're going to get into some fun stuff as kind of a reward for working through the basic stuff and doing it really, really well.

[00:16:48.69] That's cool. You know, Augustana has been a successful athletic department and program that you've been a part of for going on six years now. Speak to just the success and just the support of that institution, and why that has been such a positive place for you to thrive as a young strength coach. And I'm trying to think back, I think you had a couple of national championships in there as well, right?

[00:17:21.49] Correct. So 2019, we had-- I was a part of two national championships. So Olivia Montez Brown on our track team won the indoor pentathlon in 2019. And she also took-- she was also the runner-up in the outdoor multi that same year. And then the softball team won the National Championship in 2019 as well. And then there's been men's basketball and baseball have also won national championships in the time I've been here.

[00:17:53.52] So it's really been great to be a part of an athletic department with that much success. A lot of teams here are always on the cusp of making a big run. If they can make it out of the conference tournament, make it in the regionals, they're always a threat. That's kind of the story with our softball team. We're always a threat to win the conference championship and make a big run in regionals, go on to super regionals.

[00:18:22.25] So their success just is a testament to their athletes' dedication to everything that's involved with being a student athlete-- how they perform in the classroom, how they practice, how they perform on the field, their dedication to strength and conditioning, and how they hold themselves accountable. That 2019 team had some really excellent senior leadership, and that's really a huge part of why they won.

[00:18:57.02] And then Olivia on our track team, she's very, very talented, very athletic, and she kind of made a big commitment to strength and conditioning. She was a-- she was from England, and she came in kind of in the middle of the year. And she was an All-American her first year, but didn't really do as well as she thought she would.

[00:19:26.37] And she realized she needed to make a big commitment to practice and to strength and conditioning, and stayed here during the off season in Sioux Falls during the summer, trained really, really hard, and made a huge commitment to strength and conditioning. And that really carried her to have success that following season.

[00:19:45.84] That's great. And go back to the beginning for us. Who have been some of the biggest influences for you getting into strength and conditioning and just through your career?

[00:19:56.84] Oh, gosh-- probably going to be a really long list. Everybody at La Crosse-- Jim White, Travis Erickson, Adam Maronde were really pivotal in getting me my start and giving me that foundation. And the Olympic staff at Michigan-- Mike Favre, Bo Sandoval, Jason Cole, Lew Porchiazzo-- those guys really helped me solidify my philosophy that was kind of established at La Crosse.

[00:20:32.51] Nate Moe at South Dakota State was really pivotal in my development. Took me in as a GA, and let me do my thing. Didn't micromanage me, let me train my teams, let me learn by doing, and has been a really great mentor ever since.

[00:20:50.51] My time at Olympic Training Center was great. Ambrose Serrano really helped me learn a lot more about sprint training, programming and technique, and stuff like that. And we actually had a USA weightlifting level 2 certification when I was there that was in conjunction with a weightlifting camp. And so Leo Totten and his staff was there.

[00:21:15.50] And Ambrose and Leo Totten's staff really helped me be-- really helped me understand a lot more about the Olympic lifts and what you're actually seeing during a lift, and like, OK, if an athlete is making this error, it's probably because they're making a different error somewhere else. It's just presenting itself as something else. So really seeing the root of those things really helped and has really helped me coach my athletes to be proficient at those things.

[00:21:46.76] And here at Augustana, Coach Chambers has been great support to me in everything I do, helps me navigate relationships with sport coaches and administrators. And we collaborate on programs and things like that. So he's been really great to work with as well.

[00:22:07.99] That's awesome, man. You touched on sort of developing your philosophy as a strength coach, and that's something that is really important for young strength coaches to go through as a process, and to really be critical of what is important to you, how your values align with the training process and the experience you're getting in your early internships.

[00:22:31.58] And I loved when you were going through your background and all the stops you had along the way. But that is so true for many coaches that have so many stops. And this is a challenging road in coaching. This is a challenging profession, but there's so many positive takeaways that you learn when you're at these internship after internship, trying to land that first full-time job.

[00:22:57.34] You know, I remember it's like all I wanted was medical benefits early on. I just wanted medical benefits, and I didn't care how much it was, it was just a salary. Just something on paper that I knew I could get just for showing up and doing what I love to do every single day. And such a real thing for strength coaches, and to hear you say that.

[00:23:19.48] I want to give you the chance to kind of share your coaching philosophy. You know, what is your coaching philosophy, and what do you aim to do when you're working with athletes?

[00:23:29.37] Well, my basic philosophy is I'm going to train the complete athlete. We're going to do the Olympic lifts. We're going to squat. We're going to hinge. We're going to press. We're going to pull.

[00:23:42.52] We're going to do through those things on one leg, on two legs, with one arm, with two arms. We're going to do-- we're going to sprint. We're going to jump. We're going to jump in all directions. We're going to do change of direction. We're going to do agility. We're going to cover all the bases.

[00:23:59.70] Strength and conditioning is still general. So everything I do is going to help in some way. So if we do-- if we can do something of everything, each sport might be-- soccer might do a little more conditioning than another sport would or vice versa. But if we do all those things and do them really well, I'm going to be able to produce a very good athlete and help kids improve.

[00:24:29.86] I like the Olympic lifts. I like the powerlifts. I like the basic progressive overload wave loading, if you want to call it, model. I really-- then aside from all the programming and stuff like that, the kids-- I want the kids to work hard, but I want it to be fun.

[00:24:54.04] I want them to enjoy seeing themselves improve. I want them to be excited to come to the weight room. I want it to be a place where they look forward to coming to, and it's fun in there. But then we're going to get to work.

[00:25:13.07] It's really cool to see kids hit big PRs and get really excited and get excited for each other. And I think that's really powerful and helps develop a lot of confidence. Our volleyball team, in particular, is always saying, I want to see another team's weightlifting cards. I want to see their programs and see if they're stronger than us. And I'm sure there's other teams out there that are really strong. But the fact that they think they're the strongest is really cool to see.

[00:25:44.75] I like how you presented strength and conditioning as sport general training. Because I think for most athletes we're going to work with, unless you are working with elite Olympic athletes or professional athletes later in careers, we work with athletes that need those general foundation.

[00:26:04.58] It's a great starting point as a strength coach to emphasize those areas, to have a foundation of the powerlifts, of the Olympic lifts, of just the basic training concepts and training progressions that maybe right now, the way we look at sports science and technology, and all these things aren't getting the attention that they were 15, 20, 30 years ago, but they are still so relevant.

[00:26:31.42] So I think that philosophy still carries a lot of weight today. And something that-- there are so many athletes out there that need strength and conditioning, just basic strength and conditioning. I can think of-- and you spoke to it with your background. I think we all as strength coaches have a little bit of that overcome story or something that we couldn't do that the weight room made it better for us.

[00:27:00.23] We got on the field as athletes because we started lifting weights, and we started running more, and we started just learning the basic fundamentals of training. And it's important as a field we stay close to those fundamentals. And as things progress, we still pass that on to future generations of coaches because there's so much value there.

[00:27:23.78] Yeah. I'm really glad you're on, man. I think it's awesome to bring on young coaches that still have a whole career ahead. You aspire to be a head college strength coach. Talk about your-- all these experiences that you've had, what type of program would you want to lead one day as a head strength coach, and how would you manage your staff?

[00:27:50.56] To tell a funny story, I ran into a friend, a former classmate, at a conference. And he works at Wisconsin right now. And he was like, where do you want to be? Like, what do you want to do?

[00:28:05.77] And obviously, like everyone-- that's everyone's goal is to be a head strength coach. I think that goes without saying. Everyone wants to be a head strength coach, run their own staff and things like that.

[00:28:16.30] But I was like, man, I just want to work with my friends, you know? I just want to work with some cool people. And he's like, man, me too. Me too. So that was really cool to hear.

[00:28:29.58] So yeah, obviously, I'd like to be a head strength coach. Where and what level is not exactly important to me. I love being at Augustana and being in Division II right now. It's been really great to me.

[00:28:46.97] I'd love to put together a staff of experienced and young coaches, to kind of help those young coaches develop. It'd be great if I could get some of these former Augustana athletes that are moving into strength and conditioning, and eventually work with them somewhere down the road, and be a staff that really helps our athletes perform well and instill that work ethic and that love for lifting.

[00:29:23.91] It's really great when our athletes really support the weight room and buy in, and that's kind of my vision is that I'd have-- we'd have this influence over the entire athletic department, and every team would be like that, where they really buy in. They want to come and get-- come to the weight room and get after it. So that's kind of my vision of how I'd want my staff to work out.

[00:29:49.97] From one thing I've learned is that it's important as a young strength coach and progressing through the different tiers of experience to always be evaluating your goals and re-evaluating and asking questions about what your values are, what's important to you, what are you working towards?

[00:30:11.27] I really liked how you shared all of your individual stops along the way and all of the influences that you've had, and just to be where you're at today. And that's such a positive mentality to take on such a challenging career with. I think that is something that can make or break a lot of young coaches that don't always last in this field.

[00:30:36.62] And I want to ask you one thing about being a young, aspiring head strength coach, about your experience getting into the field. I've said this a few times in meetings and presentations lately, is that we as a field have not always been the most welcoming field to young coaches.

[00:30:56.93] I feel like in recent years, it's gotten so much better. I think there's a generation of head strength coaches and leaders in the profession that are putting their arm and mentoring young coaches, and helping to take that generation forward and advance the starting point. Speak to your experience as a young coach, and just what have been some of the challenges, and what have been some of the real positives that you've experienced?

[00:31:30.80] Yeah. I mean, being a young coach is hard. Applying for all those internships and maybe only get a handful of interviews, and having to pack up your car and move across the country. I've done that a whole bunch of times. So I did four internships. Fortunately, two of those were paid at the Olympic Training Centers. But it was hard.

[00:31:57.67] I did three internships before I found a graduate assistantship. And then after that I didn't find a full-time job right away and had to do another internship. But I just kept at it. And I knew if I kept getting those experiences, something is going to pop up, whether it's through a cold application or through someone I know.

[00:32:20.35] I think the who you know thing is both good and bad in strength and conditioning. It kind of closes the door to those outside applicants a lot of times. But it's also how a lot of people get where they're at.

[00:32:39.02] That's how I got to Augustana. My friend Logan was the assistant strength coach before me at Augustana, and we were GAs together at South Dakota State. So he left for another school and asked me if I wanted it. And I said, yep.

[00:32:52.24] And I left South Carolina and came to Augustana. And it kind of gave me some instant credibility with the athletes because I-- hey, I know Logan. And they're like, oh, OK. You're cool.

[00:33:02.95] So being a young coach is hard. And so being able to stick through it, and you'll eventually land something. Something's going to pop up, and keeping in touch with people is powerful in that aspect.

[00:33:21.68] Yeah, man, I agree with the networking piece and just connecting with as many coaches in the field as possible. And every young coach should aspire to have such a long list of people that have influenced their career as what you presented here. Andy, take a minute-- how can our listeners get in touch with you if they want to reach out?

[00:33:45.56] So Augustana's social media is @Augiestrength-- A-U-G-I-E strength on Twitter and Instagram. My personal Instagram is Stocksthestrengthcoach. No Twitter. No Twitter for me, but social media, or you can reach out to me through email. You can find that on GoAugie.com.

[00:34:06.86] Awesome, man. That was Andy Stocks, the assistant strength and conditioning coach at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He is the NSCA's Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year. Really excited to have you on the show. Congrats, again, on your award, and thanks for sharing with us.

[00:34:28.68] Thanks, Eric. It's been really great being recognized for such a great award by the NSCA, and it's been great doing the podcast with you.

[00:34:36.33] To our listeners, thanks for tuning in, and we'd also like to thank Sorinex exercise equipment. We appreciate their support.

[00:34:44.16] Thank you for listening to the NSCA Coaching Podcast. We truly appreciate your support and wouldn't be able to do this without you. If you enjoy our episodes, please write us a review at iTunes or Google Play, wherever you download your episodes from. Also, be sure to subscribe so that you get these delivered to you every other week right on time. You can also go to NSCA.com and check out the episodes there.

[00:35:04.75] [MUSIC PLAYING]

[00:35:05.54] This was the NSCA's Coaching Podcast. The National Strength and Conditioning Association was founded in 1978 by strength and conditioning coaches to share information, resources, and help advance the profession. Serving coaches for over 40 years, the NSCA is the trusted source for strength and conditioning professionals. Be sure to join us next time.

[00:35:24.11] [MUSIC PLAYING]

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Eric L. McMahon, MEd, CSCS,*D, RSCC*D

Strength & Conditioning Coach, NSCA Headquarters, Colorado Springs, CO, United States

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Eric McMahon is the Coaching and Sport Science Program Manager at the NSCA Headquarters in Colorado Springs. He joined the NSCA Staff in 2020 with ove ...

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Andrew Stocks, CSCS, RSCC

Strength & Conditioning Coach, Augustana University

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Coach Andrew Stocks was recently named the 2021 NSCA Assistant College Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Year. Coach Stocks joined Augustana Univ ...

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