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NSCA’s Coaching Podcast, Episode 97: Jason Soileau & Mandy Nice

by Eric McMahon, MEd, CSCS, RSCC*D, Jason Soileau, CSCS, TSAC-F, and Mandy Nice, NSCA-CPT, TSAC-F
Coaching Podcast March 2021

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NSCA Tactical Program Managers, Jason Soileau (Military) and Mandy Nice (Public Safety), talk to the NSCA Coaching and Sport Science Program Manager, Eric McMahon, about supporting those in the tactical professions over the course of their careers. Topics under discussion include the U.S. Army Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) program and developing a new tactical strength and conditioning program tool kit for public safety agencies.

Find Jason and Mandy on Facebook: NSCA Tactical Strength and Conditioning SIG | Find Eric on Instagram: @ericmcmahoncscs or Twitter: @ericmcmahoncscs

Show Notes

“And H2F is an acronym for Holistic Health and Fitness. So it's a five-prong approach to wellness for the Army soldier, and that includes mental, physical, spiritual, financial, and just overall health. So really, it's an admirable program. And they're really investing a lot of dollars into their personnel, not only for effectiveness currently and in the short-term, but in the long-term over the lifespan of that member, whether they leave the Army, retire, or become a lifer in the Army.” 14:58

“So as far as strength and conditioning is concerned, they plan to contract-- or the government contracting agencies will hire-- roughly 840 strength coaches over the course of four to five years, to basically lead brigades in their physical fitness training. So it's a huge undertaking. But I feel like it's an important one, because the goal is to increase readiness and resilience of the personnel, but also decrease injury likelihood and injury occurrence.” 15:43

“The Army loses a lot of money, to the tune of millions, on reconditioning and rehab of musculoskeletal injuries every year. So this is an effort to invest in the prevention of that and save money on the back end, which inherently, I think, it's going to work.” 16:15

“And I heard one individual describe it as offering autonomy in an austere environment. And I think that's a great explanation of the overall goal of the strength and conditioning professional. You're giving that personnel and the command staff the tools to be successful in terms of physical fitness, no matter where they are on the globe. And if they're still in the Army or not, wherever they go in their life span, they'll still have those foundations that you taught them to carry them through their health and wellness journey for the lifespan.” 19:11

“And public safety specifically, sometimes we see the challenge being not so much strength and conditioning itself, but more so how to implement an agency-wide program that is, again, evidence-proven and results focused and practical and user-friendly for everyone.” 25:24

Transcript

[00:00:00.00] [THEME MUSIC]

[00:00:00.66] Welcome to the NSCA Coaching Podcast, episode 97.

[00:00:05.37] Being able to provide them with education and curriculum, and opportunities to protect their health and protect their fitness level throughout their career, so that they can enjoy a healthy career and a long retirement afterwards, is what gets me excited every single day.

[00:00:21.54] This is the NSCA's Coaching Podcast, where we talk to strength and conditioning coaches about what you really need to know but probably didn't learn in school. There's strength and conditioning, and then there's everything else.

[00:00:32.25] Hey, everyone. This is the NSCA Coaching Podcast. And today, I'm joined by two members of our tactical team here at the NSCA, Jason Soileau and Mandy Nice.

[00:00:41.73] But before we get too far in, Jason is the newest member of our team at the NSCA, overseeing military programs and initiatives to support coaches and strengthen conditioning practices across multiple branches. Jason, you've been in your role for more than a few weeks now. But I just want to say welcome to the team, man.

[00:01:00.77] Well, hello and thank you for that. I really appreciate that. I'm excited to be here. I'm really happy to be in this role. And I'm just working as hard as I possibly can to advocate for our members in the tactical realm and just grow the field organically, moving forward.

[00:01:18.87] So we also have Mandy with us from the public safety side of the Tactical Strength and Conditioning Department. Mandy has been instrumental in overseeing our virtual events and dealing with COVID-19, all the challenges we have. I'm just so thankful for your contributions on the virtual event side of things.

[00:01:42.78] But also, just keeping the tactical program afloat, as we did have a little transition with Nate Palin leaving for another opportunity, and just all the programs that are going on. We're moving forward, full head of steam. So credit to you on that, Mandy.

[00:02:00.98] Hey, thanks so much for having me here today. And it's just an honor to be in this role to again just support our tactical professionals, and especially our public safety members, who give so much to our communities. It's a pleasure and honor to get to help them help give back.

[00:02:14.80] Awesome. So one great thing about the NSCA is that we work well as a team, across all of our audiences. And for our listeners today, these are my people. You know, this is an opportunity to learn some of the inner workings of the NSCA, the dynamic and passion that we have in supporting you-- the coaches and professionals-- who are out in the field helping athletes, and in taking this profession forward.

[00:02:42.81] So Jason, being the newest member of our team, give us a little background for our listeners who haven't heard your story yet. And also, how do you see your new role? And what are you most excited about?

[00:02:57.10] So yeah, I don't know if it's an interesting story, but I'll give it. So I was lucky enough. I spent six years active in the US Air Force as a structural engineer, had the opportunity to deploy in support of OIF. So that was a great experience, learning experience for me.

[00:03:17.99] And then fortunately, the last two years, I went to inactive status. So I decided to go back to school, got a bachelor's and master's degree in Exercise and Sports Science from the University of Louisiana. Go Ragin Cajuns.

[00:03:32.25] And then, my master's degree, I was fortunate enough to be a GA under Dr. David Bellar. He's a longtime member of NSCA, but he really opened my eyes to the research world while I was primarily studying and learning under the strength and conditioning aspect. While there, Dr. Bellar opened my eyes to research and the impact it can have, and how fulfilling it was for me.

[00:04:03.40] And it ended up turning into a professional opportunity at Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. And fortunately, they had a great program that supported their staff, which allowed me to pursue my PhD at Louisiana State University under Dr. Neil Johannsen, studying exercise physiology. And while there, I was networked with some really great individuals who were doing research for the Department of Defense at the time, Dr. Jennifer Rood, Dr. Stefan Pasiakos.

[00:04:40.78] And they allowed me to collaborate with them on some of their work, where we were really trying to learn more about the negative physiological consequences that occur with military operations. And the scope we were working in, the common occurrence that we see, is calorie deficit. So they have extended physical activity. They can burn up to 7,000 calories a day, easily.

[00:05:07.66] And due to the increased stress of that environment, their appetite can be suppressed and they won't ingest the needed calories for a number of reasons. So you're looking at anywhere from 1,500 to 3,500 calorie deficit on a daily basis. And operations can last anywhere from three to 30 days.

[00:05:30.97] So in the long-term, it's rather detrimental to their lean mass, bone mass, and other biomarkers that go into that. So Dr. Rood and Dr. Pasiakos were collaborating on therapies to mitigate those losses. And they had some really good results.

[00:05:51.36] And my work sort of centered around biomarkers related to cytokines, inflammation markers. And then, I decided to dive into the deep pool of genomics related to that of stress. So we really looked at micro-RNA, to try to understand if there were cascading signals that were leading to these other outcomes.

[00:06:17.30] So we sort of knew the outcome. And we started working back from there. That data is not yet published. We're in the work of getting it all together, putting into review. But it was really, really fascinating and exciting to work in that environment. And I'm eternally grateful for them.

[00:06:35.81] And then, as I ended or got to the end of my PhD program, I started looking for opportunities. And I noticed that the Tactical Program Manager for the Military position was open at the NSCA. And it really intrigued me. It was a population I always wanted to work with and help, with an organization I always respected and trusted, been a member since 2015.

[00:06:59.38] So I decided to put in my application just to see what happens. And gratefully, I got an interview, and then a couple more interviews. And I was selected for the position.

[00:07:11.02] And it was a really good day when that happened. I was excited for the position. I knew that I'd be working for the betterment of the NSCA members, as well as the military personnel. And that was just kind of my passion. So I don't see this as a job or work. This is just me waking up, doing what I want to do every day.

[00:07:36.11] That's awesome, man. And I think all of us here feel that way. You know, as coaches and as strength and conditioning professionals, we are so deeply connected to our subject area. And just hearing you speak to even your research interests, really that comes through loud and clear.

[00:07:54.67] And I remember during the interview process, sitting in on some of that, really liked that you can connect on a higher level to some of the advanced and deeper topics that maybe we don't always think of with the military side of strength and conditioning. But you also had that coaching experience. And you also had that active duty experience.

[00:08:14.81] So you can relate across multiple levels that soldiers deal with, that different types of soldiers deal with, that maybe are underrepresented groups within the tactical military strength and conditioning spectrum, right now. So I'm really excited about what you're going to be able to bring.

[00:08:35.09] Mandy, I want to ask you a similar question. What inspired you towards pursuing strength and conditioning and your work in the public safety realm?

[00:08:46.98] Thanks, so much. Well, it's an exciting place to be for sure. I've been in this industry for about 15 years. And my specialty has been implementing tactical strength and conditioning programs that are practical, science-based, evidence-proven, and results focused. So I came into the field as a personal trainer, also had some experience in corporate wellness as well, but saw an opportunity to actually start volunteering for a local Sheriff's office.

[00:09:18.51] I became good friends with some of the deputies there. And they explained some of their needs, in terms of injury risk reduction and things like that. And so, that was really my start into the industry, was just with volunteering and doing my best to give back to the people who give our community so much.

[00:09:37.68] And that turned out really well. We ended up putting together a program that reduced injury cost by a quarter million dollars in one year, and actually helped officers lose over 2000 pounds of body fat. So that was published in FBI National Academy magazine and also in the IACP Police Chief magazine.

[00:09:58.44] And those opened up some doors to work full-time in a position as a wellness manager, and then also as a small business owner doing consulting for other agencies. So throughout my entire duration of my career, I've been NSCA certified as a CPT and a TSAC-F, both of which have just come in handy in more ways than I could ever explain.

[00:10:21.84] But when the opportunity came to fruition to become involved in the tactical program here, especially as the Tactical Program Manager for public safety, I was elated because these are just some of the most incredible individuals in public safety. They're just some of the most incredible individuals that have such a selfless spirit. They give everything they have to everyone around them, whether it's to keep them safe or to-- they give so much to their families, as well.

[00:10:50.64] They're just really inspiring human beings. But the one thing about them is that they are so selfless, that they sometimes don't get to take care of themselves. And so, being able to provide them with education and curriculum and opportunities to protect their health and protect their fitness level and throughout their career, so that they can enjoy a healthy career and a long retirement afterwards is what gets me excited every single day, because they're just outstanding individuals and it's a real honor to support them.

[00:11:22.62] I've been really inspired by work from Dr. Alvar, Dr. Orr, Dr. Dawes, John Hoffman, Leslie Frye, Mick Stierli. There are leaders all around the world who are doing incredible things in this industry. And I am just so excited to unify all of us together, so that we can bring the mission forward of helping support these tactical professionals and support their health and safety, so that again, they get to enjoy that healthy career and long retirement afterwards.

[00:11:51.85] You know, you spoke to our tactical coaching network here at the NSCA. And you are well-ingrained in that network, just from your previous role as the Associate Tactical Manager and now, in a more focused role on public safety. And that's so exciting, that we've expanded our resources in that space to be more focused on an audience that is growing.

[00:12:22.01] I think the military gets a lot of-- when you think tactical strength and conditioning, it gets a lot of the attention. But the public safety space, these are everyday people that we connect with out in the community. And they have such a unique and demanding job and career that they-- and sacrifice that they put themselves through for other people.

[00:12:46.46] And so, it's exciting from an NSCA standpoint that we are stepping up to serve that community better. And I'm really thankful for your contributions on that, to both of you. You know, we recently held a virtual job fair for tactical coaches, and connected with some of the government contracting agencies who were involved with the different military branches.

[00:13:13.45] I know just from a general strength and conditioning standpoint, this is sort of a weird concept to me of oh, wait, I work for the Army. But I'm actually working for this different company. And so, I really thought it was a great gateway into this job fair area of introducing this new job space, this new career space.

[00:13:39.13] I go back to my early years as a student member young coach at NSCA. The job board on the NSCA site was really important to me. And it wasn't just the opportunities I was seeking at the time, but I also saw jobs that maybe I wasn't qualified for yet but could be on the landscape for later on in my career, and seeing what those job requirements were like.

[00:14:00.85] So I really thought this virtual job fair that you guys created was a great progression of that concept, and definitely something we can build on. I'm excited to bring it into the coaching and sports science base as we build things out. Jason, one of the areas gaining a lot of momentum right now is the Army H2F program. Many of the job fair positions focused on the H2F program. So Jason, can you take us through that program, and what it's going to mean for the Army as well as strength and conditioning coaches?

[00:14:40.60] Yeah, so the Army, they've had this program in development for some time now. But they are rolling it out this year. They already have a handful of coaches embedded within some brigades already. But they really want to go full scale with this.

[00:14:57.83] And H2F is an acronym for Holistic Health and Fitness. So it's a five-prong approach to wellness for the Army soldier, and that includes mental, physical, spiritual, financial, and just overall health. So really, it's an admirable program. And they're really investing a lot of dollars into their personnel, not only for effectiveness currently and in the short-term, but in the long-term over the lifespan of that member, whether they leave the Army, retire, or become a lifer in the Army.

[00:15:35.08] So as far as strength and conditioning is concerned, they plan to contract-- or the government contracting agencies will hire-- roughly 840 strength coaches over the course of four to five years, to basically lead brigades in their physical fitness training. So it's a huge undertaking. But I feel like it's an important one, because the goal is to increase readiness and resilience of the personnel, but also decrease injury likelihood and injury occurrence.

[00:16:15.32] The Army loses a lot of money, to the tune of millions, on reconditioning and rehab of musculoskeletal injuries every year. So this is an effort to invest in the prevention of that and save money on the back end, which inherently, I think, it's going to work. And I hope it works tremendously, because that would just speak to the coaches and the other personnel that are in place with those units to improve the resiliency and readiness of that personnel.

[00:16:47.36] But I think it's an incredible opportunity for current coaches, up and coming coaches, interns, even students at this point to pay attention to, because as they're hiring quite a few this year, there will be a second wave and a third wave and a fourth wave. Every fiscal year, they'll be hiring more and more coaches. So if you're a student, keep working towards finishing your education and certification.

[00:17:13.67] If you're a recent graduate or you're in grad school and you're interning now, use that experience to learn as much as you can, because these government contracting agencies and the command staff of these brigades is really valuing that experience. And if you're an established coach already, you're an experienced coach, it may be an interesting look to look at the possibility of working in the tactical realm.

[00:17:38.61] We understand that it's not the athletic realm. It's not the traditional collegiate professional athletic realm. You're working with a different group of personnel. In the athletic professional realm, they are athletes. They are the 2% that make it to that level and beyond. And you're fine tuning highly capable people, at that point.

[00:18:06.88] But at the Army personnel level, you will have your athletes. But you do have regular people there, as well. And the age range is not just 18 to 23. It can be 18 to 50. So you're working with a very diverse group of individuals.

[00:18:24.17] Some have athletic backgrounds. Some don't. And some prefer alternative. Some are highly aerobic. Some enjoy weightlifting more than aerobics. It's just a very, very diverse group of individuals.

[00:18:38.12] But I think that presents a fun challenge for the tactical strength and conditioning coach to hone your skills and become better overall. You're building a foundation of health and wellness for the lifespan of that individual. So coaching fundamentals, presenting information, important information in a simple way that that person can digest and carry with them when they go, either deployed or they leave the Army and they're working out on their own, I think that's important.

[00:19:10.62] And I heard one individual describe it as offering autonomy in an austere environment. And I think that's a great explanation of the overall goal of the strength and conditioning professional. You're giving that personnel and the command staff the tools to be successful in terms of physical fitness, no matter where they are on the globe. And if they're still in the Army or not, wherever they go in their life span, they'll still have those foundations that you taught them to carry them through their health and wellness journey for the lifespan.

[00:19:41.74] I really like that thought process, because it's about expanding opportunities into tactical strength and conditioning. But there's also those expanded opportunities to grow our strength and conditioning curriculum to represent a broader audience, beyond essentially the college age years. And that's so relevant.

[00:20:05.14] I mean, I can speak to it from the professional sports side of things when you get older athletes. But on the tactical, the public safety side, I mean, this is so relevant and so important to think beyond your peak athleticism years, beyond just training for explosive power and taking it out to the field. Well, the field might be, depending on what your role is in the tactical space, it could be on deployment.

[00:20:37.81] It could be when the bell rings at a fire station, or you get a call as a police officer. So it's such a unique but different requirement of just alertness and readiness. And that's just a recurring theme that I hear on the tactical side. I think it's really, really cool to hear that.

[00:21:01.36] Mandy, a few months back, we had Bryce Long on the podcast. And he shared about his path from being a firefighter and heading into strength and conditioning. Can you speak to how strength the conditioning has expanded into police, fire, and rescue departments, emerging roles, and some of the key organizations that you work with to help these opportunities grow?

[00:21:25.31] Yeah, absolutely. So we have a lot of subject matter experts who are contributing to the field, to help advance resources and resource availability for fire and for of course, police. In fact, Dr. Dawes is doing a really interesting project with fire, right now. And Joe Dulla is doing some really interesting work with police, as well.

[00:21:47.93] And we have a number of SMEs. So if you're interested in becoming one, please get in touch with us and we'll be happy to talk. So what we're really looking at in the field of public safety, and especially on the strength and conditioning side, is supporting holistic health, similar to what the military is doing, but also, supporting individuals and tactical professionals through the continuum of their career.

[00:22:10.35] So for example, I'm in law enforcement. Oftentimes, the Academy includes physical fitness training on a daily basis. But what we've seen is that it's often hard to maintain that routine once an officer is hired. So you might see things pop up in their career experience after they graduate from the Academy.

[00:22:30.74] They might experience musculoskeletal pain, especially back pain. They might experience some injuries along the course of their career. And what we want to do is help give them physical fitness programs that support them throughout any phase. So yes, support them through the Academy to make sure they do a great job there, but also support them at every stage of their career.

[00:22:55.08] So when they first get on to the job, we want to be able to support them whether they're on day shift or night shift. We want to give them that physical fitness support and holistic health support that they need to stay healthy and fit when they first start their career. And then, in the middle of their career, maybe they've experienced an injury or two. We want to make sure that we give them the physical fitness resources and guidance that help them overcome injuries and become even stronger after them, and don't suffer any additional aches or pains or musculoskeletal imbalances because of it.

[00:23:27.57] And then, we also want to help them as they retire, and even after they retire, optimize their fitness and their health so that they can function at full capacity and enjoy life to its fullest. But really paying attention to that continuum, and helping them through that continuum of their career and maintaining health and fitness throughout, is really important for law enforcement and for fire and rescue, as well.

[00:23:49.73] We are, again-- you know, we're always looking for input from subject matter experts. I like to use the phrase you listen-- excuse me, you speak and we listen. If you see-- if there are professionals listening today that see a need in the field or have some input on how we can solve problems in the field and again, just advance strength and conditioning in this field together, then I welcome your input.

[00:24:12.41] This is a team effort. I might be the Program Manager, but I'm only one person. My role is really to give you all a platform so that you can speak, and so that you can have an opportunity to make a real impact in the industry and really help change lives. A couple of resources that I will share that we're working on that I'm really excited about are upgrading our tactical strength and conditioning practitioner's course.

[00:24:38.81] It's a four to five day course, depending on which you prefer to take. But that course does lay a great foundation for learning about tactical strength and conditioning and how to program exercise for job specific tasks. So how fit do you need to be an officer, a successful one? How fit do you need to be a firefighter? What does it take to be an EMS?

[00:25:02.54] Those are things that we explain in that course. And we're upgrading it to ensure that, of course, it's evidence-proven as per NSCA tradition. But it's also extremely practical and extremely user friendly. Another resource that we're developing right now is the tactical strength and conditioning program implementation toolkit.

[00:25:23.24] And public safety specifically, sometimes we see the challenge being not so much strength and conditioning itself, but more so how to implement an agency-wide program that is, again, evidence-proven and results focused and practical and user-friendly for everyone. So what we're doing is just really helping bridge that gap, from seeing a high level of interest in strength and conditioning to actually implementing a program that everyone can participate in-- regardless of their fitness level-- but that everyone can participate in and have a highly rewarding experience in, as well.

[00:26:04.67] An area of growth, you talked about specific programs coming from the NSCA that are designed to educate coaches and professionals in the tactical realm. But I think it's really encouraging when you see academic programs advancing in the tactical space, as well. I know we've connected with The Citadel. And you mentioned Dr. Jay Dawes, you know, and just the number of professionals that have gone the tactical route, whether they came from sport or they were active duty and served and wanted to advance the profession further in that way.

[00:26:47.18] And so, it's really encouraging for young coaches. You have an advanced starting point to maybe a lot of the coaches that are in the field right now, that you can actually go and get a master's degree in a tactical strength and conditioning focus major. I think that's so encouraging. I remember, even in the early 2000s, you had to track down strength and conditioning graduate programs just on the coaching side, because they were on the rise.

[00:27:17.65] And so, it's really nice to see all this growth in tactical and all the added resources. And now, it's turning into academic programs. So I really enjoyed hearing about that. Share some of the upcoming tactical events-- I know tactical training's on the horizon, give you guys both an opportunity to share there.

[00:27:41.32] Yes, so tactical annual training is coming up, August 1st through the 6th. We are so excited for that. The speaker applications are out. So if you're interested in speaking, then please let us know. We would be happy to get an application to you.

[00:27:57.19] But we're looking at a great opportunity to highlight hands-on sessions, lectures on all kinds of different tactical topics, everything from injury risk reduction to performance optimization, even including some cognitive performance presentations in there as well, so obviously, research and updated best practices. So it's going to be-- we're looking forward to really putting together a power-packed conference.

[00:28:25.00] Additionally, we do have the International Association of Chiefs of Police Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium coming up. If you haven't heard about that, they're one of our-- they're a great collaborative organization. I'll actually be sharing the program implementation toolkit that I mentioned earlier, there. It'll be its official debut. So that conference is coming up March 17th through the 19th. And again, if you need more information on that we'd be happy to share. And Jason, let's hear some of those updates on H2F and what to expect with that, too.

[00:29:02.34] So yeah, right now, we have from the virtual job fair, there's five government contracting agencies that are soliciting or trying to build their candidate pool of tactical strength and conditioning coaches. So they are actively seeking people interested in those jobs. The ones that participated were Leidos, KBR, Serco, Magellan Federal, and Reef Systems Corp.

[00:29:32.19] You can access the NSCA job board to see most of their postings, or either their company career page. And you know, you'll see certain qualifications, like two years experience required or other aspects. But I don't want the prospective coach to be discouraged. Still put in your application, because you can very well be contacted and receive career guidance from those recruiting agencies.

[00:30:00.87] That's also what I'm here for, is to help and advocate for the strength and conditioning professional. Right now, as I'm aware, there are currently seeking people or individuals with at least a bachelor's degree in some form of kinesiology or exercise science, as well as a CSCS as a minimum. TSAC-F certification certainly does bolster your capabilities, and even multifaceted individuals, such as someone with a CSCS and an athletic training certification or PT certification.

[00:30:34.44] They're looking for really holistically trained individuals. So you can find those opportunities on the NSCA job board as well as the respective companies' websites. But I'm always here to answer any questions any individual may have. So they can reach me at jason.soileau@nsca.com. And Mandy's available too, at mandy.nice@nsca.com.

[00:30:57.25] Yes, that's Mandy-- M-A-N-D-Y-- dot nice@nsca.com. And additionally, we have a really great special interest group on Facebook. And we welcome everyone to join for the latest updates. And you can just find that under the tactical special interest group on Facebook, again.

[00:31:15.89] Well, like I told everybody at the beginning, you guys are my people. You guys are-- we're a department here at the NSCA. And I truly value our conversations on a daily basis, and just being able to have other strength coaches in the building and people that I can connect with on the coaching side. Jason, I will say that this will be my first annual tactical training coming up this year--

[00:31:44.66] All right.

[00:31:46.52] --in person. And so, I've never been to one, coming out of the baseball world. And that was a relatively new conference for a lot of the years. And so, I'm really excited about that. I'm actually going to bring the podcast kit and get to know a lot of tactical professionals, while you guys are hustling and doing all the real work. But I'm really excited about that event.

[00:32:10.58] To all of our listeners, I just want to say thanks for tuning in. It's always great connecting with coaches in the field. And it's important that we here at the NSCA headquarters, that we're listening to you coaches. And everything from our special interest group conversations events, Zoom meetings, and even this podcast where we invite coaches to share their stories, it's a part of that, that listening that is so important in these audience manager roles from the NSCA.

[00:32:41.63] We hope that you enjoyed this special episode with Jason and Mandy and learned more about the NSCA tactical programs. We'd also like to thank our sponsor, Sorinex Exercise Equipment. We appreciate their support. See you next time.

[00:32:56.69] From the NSCA, thank you for listening to the NSCA Coaching Podcast. We serve you, the coaching community, so follow, subscribe, and download for future episodes. We look forward to connecting with you again soon, and hope you'll join us at an upcoming NSCA event or in one of our special interest groups. For more information, go to nsca.com.

[00:33:19.13] This was the NSCA's Coaching Podcast. The National Strength and Conditioning Association was founded in 1978 by strength and conditioning coaches to share information, resources, and help advance the profession. Serving coaches for over 40 years, the NSCA is the trusted source for strength and conditioning professionals. Be sure to join us next time.

Reporting Errors: To report errors in a podcast episode requiring correction or clarification, email the editor at publications@nsca.com or write to NSCA, attn: Publications Dept., 1885 Bob Johnson Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 80906. Your letter should be clearly marked as a letter of complaint. Please (a) identify in writing the precise factual errors in the published podcast episode (every false, factual assertion allegedly contained therein), (b) explain with specificity what the true facts are, and (c) include your full name and contact information.

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Eric L. McMahon, MEd, CSCS,*D, RSCC*D

Strength & Conditioning Coach, NSCA Headquarters, Colorado Springs, CO, United States

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Eric McMahon is the Coaching and Sport Science Program Manager at the NSCA Headquarters in Colorado Springs. He joined the NSCA Staff in 2020 with ove ...

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Mr Jason Paul Soileau, CSCS, TSAC-F

Tactical, NSCA Headquarters, Colorado Springs, CO, United States

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Jason served in the Air Force for 8 years as a structural engineer before moving into strength and conditioning and education roles at the University ...

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Mandy Nice, NSCA-CPT,*D, TSAC-F,*D

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Mandy Nice has over 15 years of experience developing and implementing physical fitness and wellness programs that measurably improve the strength and ...

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