High-Intensity Resistance and High-Impact Training and Bone Mineral Density—a Narrative Review: Part 1

by Thomas Lafantaine, PHD, CSCS, NSCA-CPT, FACSM, and Shellaine Frazier, DO
NSCA Coach May 2019
Vol 6, Issue 1

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This article is part one of a two part series. This article will discuss the basic science of BMD and the implications for programming will be discussed in the second article.

Introduction

Osteoporosis is defined as a disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture (20). Fractures of the hip and spine result in disability, decreased independence, and increased risk of death (19,20). This article is part one of a two part series. This article will discuss the basic science of BMD and the implications for programming will be discussed in the second article.

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This article originally appeared in NSCA Coach, a quarterly publication for NSCA Members that provides valuable takeaways for every level of strength and conditioning coach. You can find scientifically based articles specific to a wide variety of your athletes’ needs with Nutrition, Programming, and Youth columns. Read more articles from NSCA Coach »

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References

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Tom LaFontaine, PhD, CSCS, NSCA-CPT

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Tom LaFontaine earned his PhD in Exercise Physiology from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1983. He has published nearly 100 articles, eight boo ...

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Shellaine Frazier, DO

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Shellaine Frazier is a Board Certified Pathologist who has practiced at the University of Missouri since 2003. She has served as the Director of Surgi ...

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Available to:
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Audience:
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Topics:
Program design
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