Choosing Exercises—“The Crunch”

by Brad J. Schoenfeld, PhD, CSCS,*D, CSPS,*D, NSCA-CPT,*D, FNSCA and Stuart McGill, PhD
Personal Training Quarterly April 2017
Vol 4, Issue 2

Share:
Available to:
Members only
Audience:
Personal trainers

Should personal trainers include the crunch exercise in an exercise program? The answer should always be, “it depends;” however, arriving at the best answer requires a process.

This article originally appeared in Personal Training Quarterly (PTQ)—a quarterly publication for NSCA Members designed specifically for the personal trainer. Discover easy-to-read, research-based articles that take your training knowledge further with Nutrition, Programming, and Personal Business Development columns in each quarterly, electronic issue. Read more articles from PTQ »

Share:

1. Axler, C, and McGill, SM. Low back loads over a variety of abdominal exercises: Searching for the safest abdominal challenge. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 29(6): 804-811, 1997.

2. Franchi, MV, Atherton, PJ, Reeves, ND, Fluck, M, Williams, J, Mitchell, WK, et al. Architectural, functional and molecular responses to concentric and eccentric loading in human skeletal muscle. Acta Physiologica210(3): 642-654, 2014.

3. McGill, SM. Low Back Disorders: Evidence Based Prevention and Rehabilitation (3rd Ed). Human Kinetics: Champaign, IL; 2016.

4. McGill, SM. Back Mechanic. Backfitpro Inc.: Waterloo, Canada; 2015.

5. McGill, SM, and Axler, CT. Changes in spine height throughout 32 hours of bedrest: Implications for bedrest and space travel on the low back. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 38(9): 925-927, 1996.

6. Reilly, T, Tyrrell, A, and Troup, JDG. Circadian variation in human stature. Chronobiology International1: 121-126, 1984.

7. Roig, M, O’Brien, K, Kirk, G, Murray, R, McKinnon, P, Shadgan, B, et al. The effects of eccentric versus concentric resistance training on muscle strength and mass in healthy adults: A systematic review with meta-analysis. British Journal of Sports Medicine 43(8): 556-568, 2009.

8. Peterson, D. Proposed performance standards for the plank and inclusion consideration into the Navy’s physical readiness test. Strength and Conditioning Journal 35(5): 22-26, 2013.

9. Schoenfeld, BJ. Does exercise-induced muscle damage play a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy? The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 26(5): 1441-1453, 2012.

10. Schoenfeld, BJ. Science and Development of Muscle Hypertrophy (1st Ed). Human Kinetics: Champaign, IL; 2016.

11. Snook, SH, Webster, BS, McGarry, RW, Fogleman, MT, and McCann, KB. The reduction of chronic nonspecific low back pain through the control of early morning lumbar flexion: A randomized controlled trial. Spine 23(23): 2601-2607, 1998.

12. Tampier, C, Drake, J, Callaghan, J, and McGill, SM. Progressive disc herniation: An investigation of the mechanism using radiologic, histochemical and microscopic dissection techniques. Spine 32(25): 2869-2874, 2007.

13. Teyhen, DS, Rieger, JL, Westrick, RB, Miller, AC, Molloy, JM, and Childs, JD. Changes in deep abdominal muscle thickness during common trunk-strengthening exercises using ultrasound imaging. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy 38(10): 596-605, 2008.

14. Yates, JP, Giangregorio, L, and McGill, SM. The influence of intervertebral disc shape on the pathway of posterior/posterior lateral partial herniation. Spine 35(7): 734-739, 2010.

15. Veres, SP, Robertson, PA, and Broom, ND. The morphology of acute disc herniation: A clinically relevant model defining the role of flexion. Spine 34(21): 2288-2296, 2009

Photo of DR Brad J. Schoenfeld, PHD,CSCSDNSCACPTDCSPSD,FNSCA
About the author

DR Brad J. Schoenfeld, PHD,CSCSDNSCACPTDCSPSD,FNSCA

Contact Brad Schoenfeld

Contact Brad Schoenfeld

Your first name is required.
Your last name is required.
Your email is required.
Your message is required.
Your reCaptcha is required.

Your email was successfully sent to Brad Schoenfeld

Brad Schoenfeld is widely regarded as one of America’s leading fitness authorities. He has been published or appeared internationally in over 1000 mag...

View full biography
About the author

Stuart McGill, PhD

Contact Stuart McGill

Contact Stuart McGill

Your first name is required.
Your last name is required.
Your email is required.
Your message is required.
Your reCaptcha is required.

Your email was successfully sent to Stuart McGill

Stuart McGill is a Professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo. He has authored over 240 scientific journal papers and has mentored ...

View full biography
Available to:
Members only
Audience:
Personal trainers
#everyonestronger #everyonestronger

has been added to your shopping cart!

Continue Shopping Checkout Now