Training Clients with Shoulder Injury – Modifications and Considerations

by Aaron Shaw, CSCS and Samuel Watkins, CSCS
Personal Training Quarterly October 2020
Vol 7, Issue 2

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This article sheds some knowledge on shoulder exercise modifications and progressions that can help reduce the risk of re-injury and maximize performance for clients.

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This article originally appeared in Personal Training Quarterly (PTQ)—a quarterly publication for NSCA Members designed specifically for the personal trainer. Discover easy-to-read, research-based articles that take your training knowledge further with Nutrition, Programming, and Personal Business Development columns in each quarterly, electronic issue. Read more articles from PTQ »

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References

1. Giphart, J, Van der Meijden, O, and Millett, P. The effects of arm elevation on the 3-dimensional acromiohumeral distance: A biplane fluoroscopy study with normative data. Journal of Elbow and Shoulder Surgery 21(11): 1593-1600, 2012.

2. Hoffman, J. NSCA’s Guide to Program Design. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 2011.

3. Heugel, J, Williams, A, and Soslowsky, L. Rotator cuff biology and biomechanics: A review of normal and pathological conditions. Current Rheumatology Reports 17: 476-486, 2015.

4. Jeffreys, I. Essentials of Strength and Conditioning (4th ed). Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 318, 2016.

5. Kolber, M, Beekhuizen, K, Ming-Shun, C, and Hellman, M. Shoulder injuries attributed to resistance training: A brief review. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 24(6): 1696-1704, 2010.

6. Lauver, J, Cayot, T, and Scheuermann, B. Influence of bench angle on the upper extremity muscular activation during bench press exercise. European Journal of Sport Science 16(3): 309-316, 2016.

7. Lehman, G. The influence on grip width and forearm pronation/supination on upper body myoelectric activity during the bench press. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 19(3): 587-591, 2005.

8. Ludwig, P, and Reynolds, J. The association of scapular kinematics and glenohumeral joint pathologies. Journal of Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy 39(2): 90-104, 2009.

9. Pratt, E. Anatomy and biomechanics of shoulder. The Journal of Hand Therapy 7(2): 65-76, 1994.

10. Reinold, M, Escamilla, R, and Wilk, K. Current concepts in the scientific and clinical rationale behind exercises for glenohumeral and scapulothoracic musculature. Journal of Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy 39(2): 105-117, 2009.

11. Wattanaprakornkul, D, Halaki, M, Cathers, I, and Ginn, K. Direction-specific recruitment of the rotator cuff muscles during bench press and row. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology 21: 1041-1049, 2011.

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Aaron Shaw, CSCS

movemend.seattle
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Aaron Shaw has been practicing as an occupational therapist, with a specialty in arm and hand rehabilitation, since 1996. In 2015, he opened MoveMen ...

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Samuel Watkins, CSCS

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Sam Watkins received his Doctorate of Physical Therapy from George Washington University in 2018. He works as a physical therapist at MoveMend, an o ...

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