Understanding the Physiological Limiting Factors of VO2max

by Ronald L. Snarr, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT, Peter Chrysosferidis, CSCS, Danilo Tolusso
Personal Training Quarterly December 2018
Vol 3, Issue 5

Share:

Determining VO2max can be useful in all areas of health, from potential diagnosis of heart disease in the elderly to measuring peak performance in elite athletes. This article will discuss the physiological limiting factors of VO2max and the role each plays in cardiovascular improvement.

Read the full article


Become a Member Login

This article originally appeared in Personal Training Quarterly (PTQ)—a quarterly publication for NSCA Members designed specifically for the personal trainer. Discover easy-to-read, research-based articles that take your training knowledge further with Nutrition, Programming, and Personal Business Development columns in each quarterly, electronic issue. Read more articles from PTQ »

Share:

References

1. American College of Sports Medicine. ACSM’s Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2016.

2. Baechle, TR and Earle, RW. National Strength and Conditioning Association. Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics; 2008.

3. Bassett, DR, Jr, and Howley, ET. Limiting factors for maximum oxygen uptake and determinants of endurance performance. Medicine and Science in Sports Exercise 32: 70-84, 2000.

4. Bergh, U, Thorstensson, A, Sjödin, B, Hulten, B, Piehl, K, and Karlsson, J. Maximal oxygen uptake and muscle fiber types in trained and untrained humans. Medicine and Science in Sports Exercise 10: 151-154, 1978.

5. Blomqvist, CG, and Saltin, B. Cardiovascular adaptations to physical training. Annual Review of Physiology 45: 169-189, 1983.

6. Bouchard, C, An, P, Rice, T, Skinner, JS, Wilmore, JH, Gagnon, J, et al. Familial aggregation of VO2max response to exercise training: results from the HERITAGE Family Study. Journal of Applied Physiology 87: 1003-1008, 1999.

7. Bouchard, C, Daw, EW, Rice, T, Pérusse, L, Gagnon, J, Province, MA, et al. Familial resemblance for VO2max in the sedentary state: the HERITAGE family study. Medicine and Science in Sports Exercise 30: 252-258, 1998.

8. Bouchard, C, and Malina, RM. Genetics of physiological fitness and motor performance. Exercise and Sport Sciences Review 11: 306-339, 1983.

9. Cerretelli, P, and Di Prampero, PE. Gas exchange in exercise. Comprehensive Physiology, 1987.

10. Clausen, JP, Klausen, K, Rasmussen, B, and Trap-Jensen, J. Central and peripheral circulatory changes after training of the arms or legs. American Journal of Physiology 225: 675-682, 1973.

11. Cronan, TL, 3rd, and Howley, ET. The effect of training on epinephrine and norepinephrine excretion. Medicine and Science in Sports Exercise 6: 122-125, 1974.

12. Cureton, K, Bishop, P, Hutchinson, P, Newland, H, Vickery, S, and Zwiren, L. Sex difference in maximal oxygen uptake. Effect of equating haemoglobin concentration. European Journal of Applied Physiology 54: 656-660, 1986.

13. Drinkwater, BL. Women and exercise: Physiological aspects. Exercise and Sport Sciences Review 12: 21-51, 1984. 14. Gledhill, N, Cox, D, and Jamnik, R. Endurance athletes’ stroke volume does not plateau: Major advantage is diastolic function. Medicine and Science in Sports Exercise 26: 1116–1121, 1994.

15. Hill, AV, Long, CNH, and Lupton, H. Muscular exercise, lactic acid, and the supply and utilisation of oxygen. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 97: 84-138, 1924.

16. Holloszy, JO, and Coyle, EF. Adaptations of skeletal muscle to endurance exercise and their metabolic consequences. Journal of Applied Physiology 56: 831-838, 1984.

17. Honig, CR, Connett, RJ, and Gayeski, TE. O2 transport and its interaction with metabolism; A systems view of aerobic capacity. Medicine and Science in Sports Exercise 24: 47-53, 1992.

18. Horowitz, JF, Sidossis, LS, and Coyle, EF. High efficiency of type I muscle fibers improves performance. International Journal of Sports Medicine 15: 152-157, 1994.

19. Little, JP, Safdar, A, Bishop, D, Tarnopolsky, MA, and Gibala, MJ. An acute bout of high-intensity interval training increases the nuclear abundance of PGC-1α and activates mitochondrial biogenesis in human skeletal muscle. American Journal Physiology Regulatory, Integrative, Comparative Physiology 300: R1303-1310, 2011.

20. Midgley, AW, McNaughton, LR, and Wilkinson, M. Is there an optimal training intensity for enhancing the maximal oxygen uptake of distance runners? Sports Medicine 36: 117-132, 2006.

21. Mitchell, JH, Tate, C, Raven, P, Cobb, F, Kraus, W, Moreadith, R, et al. Acute response and chronic adaptation to exercise in women. Medicine and Science in Sports Exercise 24: S258-265, 1992.

22. Powers, SK, and Howley, ET. Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance 9th Edition. McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014.

23. Saltin, B. Hemodynamic adaptations to exercise. American Journal of Cardiology 55: 42D-47D, 1985.

24. Saltin, B, Henriksson, J, Nygaard, E, Andersen, P, and Jansson, E. Fiber types and metabolic potentials of skeletal muscles in sedentary man and endurance runners. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 301: 3-29, 1977.

25. Wagner, PD. Gas exchange and peripheral diffusion limitation. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 24: 54-58, 1992.

26. Westerblad, H, Bruton, JD, and Katz, A. Skeletal muscle: Energy metabolism, fiber types, fatigue and adaptability. Experimental Cell Research 316: 3093-3099, 2010.

Photo of Ronald L. Snarr, PhD, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT
About the author

Ronald L. Snarr, PhD, CSCS,*D, NSCA-CPT

RSnarrFitness
Contact Ronald Snarr

Contact Ronald Snarr

Your first name is required.
Your last name is required.
Your email is required.
Your message is required.
Your reCaptcha is required.

Your email was successfully sent to Ronald Snarr

Ronald Snarr is an Assistant Professor of Exercise Science at Georgia Southern University. He holds a PhD in Exercise Physiology/Human Performance fro...

View full biography
About the author

Peter Chrysosferidis, CSCS

Contact Peter Chrysosferidis

Contact Peter Chrysosferidis

Your first name is required.
Your last name is required.
Your email is required.
Your message is required.
Your reCaptcha is required.

Your email was successfully sent to Peter Chrysosferidis

Peter Chrysosferidis is currently finishing his Master’s degree from Georgia Southern University and is an undergraduate biomechanics lecturer. He has...

View full biography
About the author

Danilo Tolusso

Contact Danilo Tolusso

Contact Danilo Tolusso

Your first name is required.
Your last name is required.
Your email is required.
Your message is required.
Your reCaptcha is required.

Your email was successfully sent to Danilo Tolusso

Danilo Tolusso is a PhD student at the University of Alabama. He holds a Master’s degree in Kinesiology with a focus in Exercise Science from Bowling ...

View full biography
#everyonestronger #everyonestronger

has been added to your shopping cart!

Continue Shopping Checkout Now