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Body Mass Bias—Effects on Fitness Test and Tactical Performance

by Guy D. Leahy, MEd, CSCS,*D
TSAC Report June 2015
Vol 40, Issue 1

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Because fitness test results are part of performance evaluations, smaller service members have an advantage in terms of attaining promotions, despite evidence that suggests that greater body size, strength, power, and load carrying capacity is correlated with tactical performance.

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This article originally appeared in TSAC Report, the NSCA’s quarterly, online-only publication geared toward the training of tactical athletes, operators, and facilitators. It provides research-based articles, performance drills, and conditioning techniques for operational, tactical athletes. The TSAC Report is only available for NSCA Members. Read more articles from TSAC Report 

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Guy Leahy is currently serving as the Health Promotion Program Coordinator at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, NM. Leahy is a member of the Ame...

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