Considerations of Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) Training—A Case for Injury Prevention and Maximizing Strength for Tactical Personnel

by Nicholas Martinez, Christopher Lilla, CSCS, and Michael Renteria, CSCS
TSAC Report September 2019
Vol 53, Issue 2

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Audience:
TSAC Facilitators
Topics:
Program design

The innovative technology found in portable BFR training systems can help tactical personnel achieve greater strength and hypertrophic gains, as well as optimize training programs and overall performance.

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This article originally appeared in TSAC Report, the NSCA’s quarterly, online-only publication geared toward the training of tactical athletes, operators, and facilitators. It provides research-based articles, performance drills, and conditioning techniques for operational, tactical athletes. The TSAC Report is only available for NSCA Members. Read more articles from TSAC Report 

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References

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Nicholas Martinez

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Nic Martinez is an instructor in the Exercise Science Program at the University of South Florida. He is certified through the American College of Spor ...

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Christopher Lilla, CSCS

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Chris Lilla is serving as a Fitness and Performance Coach at Life Time Athletic in Tampa, FL. He received his Master’s degree from the University of S ...

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Michael Renteria, CSCS

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Mike Renteria serves as the Director of the Human Performance Program for Special Operations Command Central at MacDill Air Force Base. He received hi ...

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Available to:
Members only
Audience:
TSAC Facilitators
Topics:
Program design
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