Tracking Training Load and its Effect on Injury Risk and Fitness

by Daniel Maupin, CSCS and Ben Schram, TSAC-F
TSAC Report September 2019
Vol 53, Issue 5

Share:

The aim of this article is to provide those working with tactical populations an introduction into tracking training load to mitigate injury risk while concurrently optimizing fitness.

Read the full article


Become a Member Login

This article originally appeared in TSAC Report, the NSCA’s quarterly, online-only publication geared toward the training of tactical athletes, operators, and facilitators. It provides research-based articles, performance drills, and conditioning techniques for operational, tactical athletes. The TSAC Report is only available for NSCA Members. Read more articles from TSAC Report 

Related Reading

Share:

References

1. Bourdon, PC, Cardinale, M, Murray, A, Gastin, P, Kellmann, M, Varley, MC, et al. Monitoring athlete training loads: consensus statement. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance 12(2): 161-170, 2017.

2. Colby, MJ, Dawson, B, Heasman, J, Rogalski, B, and Gabbett, TJ. Accelerometer and GPS-derived running loads and injury risk in elite Australian footballers. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 28(8): 2244-2252, 2014.

3. Cross, MJ, Williams, S, Trewartha, G, Kemp, SP, and Stokes, KA. The influence of in-season training loads on injury risk in professional rugby union. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance 11(3): 350-355, 2016.

4. Gabbett, TJ. The training-injury prevention paradox: Should athletes be training smarter and harder? British Journal of Sports Medicine 50(5): 273-280, 2016.

5. Gabbett, TJ, and Domrow, N. Relationships between training load, injury, and fitness in sub-elite collision sport athletes. Journal of Sports Sciences 25(13): 1507-1519, 2007.

6. Harrison, PW, and Johnston, RD. Relationship between training load, fitness, and injury over an Australian rules football preseason. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 31(10): 2686-2693, 2017.

7. Soligard, T, Schwellnus, M, Alonso, J-M, Bahr, R, Clarsen, B, Dijkstra, HP, et al. How much is too much? (Part 1) International Olympic Committee consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury. British Journal of Sports Medicine 50(17): 1030-1041, 2016.

About the author

Daniel Maupin, CSCS

Contact Daniel Maupin

Contact Daniel Maupin

Your first name is required.
Your last name is required.
Your email is required.
Your message is required.
Your reCaptcha is required.

Your email was successfully sent to Daniel Maupin

Daniel Maupin has a background in athletic training and physical therapy. During his Doctor of Physiotherapy Degree at Bond University, he was introdu ...

View full biography
About the author

Ben Schram, TSAC-F

ben-schram
Contact Ben Schram

Contact Ben Schram

Your first name is required.
Your last name is required.
Your email is required.
Your message is required.
Your reCaptcha is required.

Your email was successfully sent to Ben Schram

Ben Schram is the research and data coordinator for the Tactical Research Unit at Bond University. His research interest is focused on maximizing the ...

View full biography
#everyonestronger #everyonestronger

has been added to your shopping cart!

Continue Shopping Checkout Now